Images of War, Early Jet Fighters 1944-1954, The Soviet Union and Europe, Rare Photographs From Aviation Archives

Another addition to the very popular Images of War series, with a mass of outstanding and rare images. The author covers important early jet combat aircraft, most of which have not been covered well before Very Highly Recommended

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

http://ftnews.firetrench.com

NAME:    Images of War, Early Jet Fighters 1944-1954, The Soviet Union and 
Europe, Rare Photographs From Aviation Archives
FILE: R3224
AUTHOR: Leo Marriott
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Cold War, 
Korean War, Middle East Wars, jet engines, aviation technology, warplanes, first 
generation jets, second generation jets, swept wings, trans sonic flight, missiles, radar

ISBN: 1-52675-393-6

PAGES: 144
IMAGE: B3224.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y4kq3rww
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Another addition to the very popular Images of War series, with a 
mass of outstanding and rare images.  The author covers important early jet combat 
aircraft, most of which have not been covered well before  Very Highly
 Recommended


One of the factors of the aircraft covered is the significant contribution of British technology. The British followed their invention of the jet engine with a first generation of power plants that were based on the centrifugal jet concept. The Germans had chosen to take the axial flow concept for their engines. During WWII, available materials favoured the centrifugal concept, providing great reliability and longer life. The German approach had the advantage of smaller frontal areas, giving greater flexibility of airframe design. After WWII advances in the design and production of materials favoured the axial approach but the first generation of jets, immediately following WWII, depended heavily on British engines or licensed manufacture of British engine designs. This meant that US, British and Russian aircraft employed the same British technology and those other countries developing jet combat aircraft also used the same engines.

When UN Forces in Korea were unpleasantly surprised by the MiG-15, they were seeing the fusion of German swept wing technology with British engines supplied by a Labour Government who saw Stalin as a more important ally that the US and were happy to present Stalin with any advanced British military technology available. After the Berlin Airlift that view had to change but by then it was too late and it was most fortunate that Churchill had shared British computer technology with the US and announced that the British Colossus computers had all been scrapped. The latter was untrue because at least two Colossus machines were secretly moved to GCHQ which took over from BCCS Bletchley Park as the British code breakers and enabled Britain and the US to break the Lorenz (to the British , ‘Tuny’ encryption machines) machines taken over by the Soviets in East Germany and used for their high level encrypted telex based communications.

To be expected in a book from this popular series, the author has built his insightful text and captioning around an outstanding selection of images, most of which are rare and previously unpublished in a book publicly available. Of particular interested are the jets designed in Sweden that were particularly interesting technologically but largely unseen outside of Sweden