Heroes of the RNLI, The Storm Warriors

This is a story of great courage and selflessness by the heroes of the unique RNLI. The tradition of saving lives around the coasts of the British Isles is long established but the creation of what is now the RNLI in the early Nineteenth Century provided a unified and highly professional maritime rescue service that has always been staffed by volunteers. Most Highly Recommended

NAME:  Heroes of the RNLI, The Storm Warriors
FILE: R3333
AUTHOR: Martyn R Beardsley
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £16.99                                                
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   SAR, Search And Rescue, RNLI, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, 
Sir William Hillary, Humane Societies, rescue at sea, bravery, courage, risk, lifeboat 
stations, peacetime activities, wartime activities, charitable organization, volunteers, 
technical achievements

ISBN: 1-52672-576-2

PAGES: 261, 8 pages of b&w images in a photo-plate section
IMAGE: B3333.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/2zpj53t9
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is a story of great courage and selflessness by the heroes of the 
unique RNLI. The tradition of saving lives around the coasts of the British Isles is 
long established but the creation of what is now the RNLI in the early Nineteenth 
Century provided a unified and highly professional maritime rescue service that 
has always been staffed by volunteers.  Most Highly Recommended

The crews of RNLI lifeboats have provided a unique charitable service without use of public funds and they have performed with outstanding courage. It is right that some of the individuals who have performed amazing and outstanding feats of great courage should be recognized, as they have been in this new book, but when a lifeboat goes out on a shout, every member is accepting, without pay, very high levels of risk and that requires dedication, professionalism and courage in equal measures.

When Sir William Hillary promoted the idea of a national maritime rescue service, he was building on many informal lifeboat services around the British coasts that were volunteers, mainly fishermen using their own fishing boats. When the Republic of Ireland left the United Kingdom, the RNLI continued to provide the lifeboat service around the RoI coasts and islands. This meant one British Isles service that benefited from the pooled experience of crews which fed into a technical development to provide the best possible vessels and equipment to provide the service. The RNLI has also been active in helping lifeboat services and beach guards around the world, as they become established, and also gaining new experiences from those distant locations.

The lifeboat stations have recruited from the immediate area and fishermen continue to be an important percentage of the crews, steeped in local knowledge from generations of fishing families. However, the RNLI has evolved. Where originally its heavy activity was during the violent storms that can spring up in Winter around British coasts and the people rescued were mainly professional seaman and merchant ships, the modern RNLI is also in great demand to rescue holiday makers, and those in small private craft, people who tried to use causeways without regard to the tide, dogs in difficulties from cliff falls, or being swept out to sea. and in providing an ambulance service between small islands and the mainland.

There have been many changes in technology from open pulling boats, to motorboats, and to the hovercraft and 25 knot lifeboats of today. The RNLI has frequently designed new technology and equipment but now also builds its own lifeboats and repairs them in its own facilities. However, it is still funded by donations and bequests, much of which comes from the communities around the lifeboat stations. Even with this, the risks are still to be faced.

This book is filled with inspirational stories of the heroes of the RNLI. Today there is greater variety in the crews. Fishing has been decimated by a greedy European Union that has plundered British waters and although many in the RNLI crews come from generations of fisherfolk, they are frequently no longer fishermen. There is a wide range of day jobs and one summer volunteer was a young lady, a dancer who worked on a Summer Show at a coastal resort.