Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II, The ‘Warthog’ Ground Attack Aircraft

This is by far the best book yet published on the A-10 ground attack aircraft and it is hard to envision it being equalled. Dedicated ground attack aircraft rarely receive adequate attention from military aviation historians. Most Highly Recommended

NAME:  Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II, The 'Warthog' Ground Attack 
Aircraft
FILE: R3328
AUTHOR: Peter C Smith
PUBLISHER: Air World, Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £35.00                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Cold War, insurgency wars, Middle East Conflict, dedicated ground 
attack aircraft, flying artillery, counter-insurgency, close support, depleted uranium 
shells, anti-armour, tank killer, single seat. Low level attack aircraft

ISBN: 1-52675-926-8

PAGES: 428, extensive illustration in B&W and full colour, including cutaway 
drawings, mission evolutions,and supporting tables
IMAGE: B3328.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/32dz97wz
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DESCRIPTION: This is by far the best book yet published on the A-10 ground attack 
aircraft and it is hard to envision it being equalled. Dedicated ground attack aircraft 
rarely receive adequate attention from military aviation historians.  Most Highly 
Recommended

The A-10 is one of those aircraft that is best replaced by itself. It drives politicians 
mad because it seems such a soft target for cost cutting, but it fills a role that remains 
essential and difficult to fill with anything else. The pilot sits in an armoured bathtub 
and everything that can be is duplicated and mounted apart to minimise the possibility 
of fatal damage from ground fire and fighter aircraft. High speed over the target is 
not a major requirement but a heavy anti-armour gun system is, together with a 
capability to hang a very heavy missile and rocket armament under the wings. The 
A-10 achieves all of that and looks like an aircraft that can fly forever.

There are very few aircraft that have so exactly filled the ground attack roles as 
successfully as the A-10. The Germans built the Halberstadt and the British Sopwith 
company built the Dolphin during WWI, which were both optimised for strafing 
ground targets, but were classed, and used also, as fighters. In WWII the German 
Stuka was flying artillery that proved impossible to completely replace and served 
through WWII. The British Hawker Typhoon was to prove a very effective ground 
attack aircraft with four cannon and underwing rockets. The Soviets produced a 
Shturmovik that was in a similar category to the Stuka and built in huge numbers and 
the German Henschel was a design that could have achieved greater acclaim had it 
been built in adequate numbers With these few exceptions, the A-10 is a very rare 
design that has been produced specifically to take out armoured ground targets and 
accept and survive ground fire.

The author has made a first rate job of presenting the A-10 and its deployments in a 
very thorough review that will make this book the definitive title for the A-10.