Cameras at War, Photo Gear That Captured 100 Years Of Conflict – From Crimea To Korea

This book is a comprehensive study of 100 years of development and use of cameras to record conflict and to support military operations. The development of combat photography during 100 years of conflict is impressive, with the quality of resilient film stock supported a rapid expansion of war photography. Most Highly Recommended

NAME: Cameras at War, Photo Gear That Captured 100 Years Of Conflict – From 
Crimea To Korea
FILE: R3283
AUTHOR: John Wade
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £16.99                                                      
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Crimean War, WWI, World War I, World War 1, First World War, The 
Great War, WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Korean War, Cold 
War, cameras, stills cameras, movie cameras, photo reconnaissance, war
correspondents, war photographers, spy cameras, technology, film stocks

ISBN: 1-52676-010-X

PAGES: 258, extensive b&w illustration through the book
IMAGE: B3283.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yy7fyxjf
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This book is a comprehensive study of 100 years of development 
and use of cameras to record conflict and to support military operations. The 
development of combat photography during 100 years of conflict is impressive, with 
the quality of resilient film stock supported a rapid expansion of war photography. Most Highly Recommended

The first cameras used during the Crimean War revolutionized military operations. Initially, they were bulky, heavy boxes that required careful handling and a mobile processing facility to turn the negatives into prints that could be handled with the same ease as paper maps. Over the one hundred years to the Korean War, cameras developed to offer a range of products to record all aspects of conflict. The camera bodies became smaller and lighter and able to operate in a wide range of conditions, including operation from aircraft. However, the most important development was in lens technology and production of film stock. From the awkward glass plate negatives of the early cameras, roll film was a dramatic advance that greatly increased the rate of framing to the point where it could be run as movie film. It became relatively easy to change rolls of film in action under the most demanding conditions. The development of lens technology was equally dramatic, giving the photographer considerable control over the way in which an image was composed under a very wide range of lighting conditions. The telephoto lens revolutionized photography, allowing a camera to record from a considerable distance and in great detail.

As cameras, lenses and film continued to improve, it became possible to process film away from the conditions experienced in combat. That has provided us with images that are as clear and crisp decades after they were recorded as when they were first printed. In the development process, new ways were tried to increase the photographer’s control of the camera, including a camera built within the casings of a Lewis machine gun.

The extensive b&w illustration matches the subject. Images of up to full page provide a unique presentation of the subject.