A Risky Meeting at Sea that Saved Democracy, Roosevelt and Churchill, The Atlantic Charter

This account of the meeting at sea of Roosevelt and Churchill was the most momentous meeting of WWII, an yet it receives remarkably little attention. The war in August 1941 was going badly for Britain and the Commonwealth, making this meeting of critical importance. Most Highly Recommended

NAME:  A Risky Meeting at Sea that Saved Democracy, Roosevelt and Churchill, 
The Atlantic Charter
FILE: R3334
AUTHOR: Michael Kluger, Richard Evans
PUBLISHER: Frontline Books, Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Atlantic Charter, 
USA, Great Britain, Roosevelt, Churchill, Alliance, United Nations, defence of 
democracy, co-operation, industrial output, Lend Lease

ISBN: 1-52678-630-3

PAGES: 203, 8 pages of b&w & full colour images in a photo-plate section
IMAGE: B3334.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/2ayzseeu
LINKS:

DESCRIPTION: This account of the meeting at sea of Roosevelt and Churchill was 
the most momentous meeting of WWII, an yet it receives remarkably little attention. 
The war in August 1941 was going badly for Britain and the Commonwealth, 
making this meeting of critical importance.  Most Highly Recommended

The British and French had honoured their pledge to Poland, exposing them to a war that was earlier than Hitler had intended. In 1940, the German Blitz Krieg appeared to show Germany dominant and unbeatable. In the USA, the general mood favoured the Germans for many reasons. Some, like US Ambassador to Britain Kennedy, hated the British and were delighted to tell Americans that the Germans would invade Britain and triumph in days. Other politicians looked enviously at the British Empire and saw British defeat as an opportunity to annex Canada and start making British colonies and dominions into US satellites. Many were just anxious to avoid foreign war.

Going into 1941, things were better for Britain and the Commonwealth only in that the RAF had denied German air superiority over Britain and the Germans had retreated from any plans to invade the British Isles. In almost every other aspect of the war, the defeats and retreats continued. At this stage, Britain desperately needed support from the US and preferably a military alliance. As a result Churchill needed to bring America to an understanding that they had to stand with Britain and the Commonwealth for democracy and defeat of Germany. He therefore had little at risk, beyond his own life, in crossing the Atlantic on a Royal Navy warship to meet with Roosevelt. Roosevelt had much to lose because, in helping Britain, he would be going against public opinion and most politicians, risking his own life in meeting at sea, and risking the US being drawn into what promised to be a very costly war.

Had the meeting taken place after the attack on Pearl Harbour, and the declaration of war on the US by Germany, both leaders would have desperately needed an alliance. Meeting in August 1941, Roosevelt was not under that pressure and the Atlantic Charter was a significant commitment to provide all support short of declaring war on Germany.

The authors have presented this vital meeting clearly and with proof from their research. This is one of the most important books about WWII.