Your Towns & Cities in World War Two, Cumbria At War 1939-45

The series is famous for producing a very affordable series of military and war history books with a high image content. This new book is a worthy addition to a well-established series. The story of the towns, cities and regions of Britain during WWII demonstrates the total war nature of this costly conflict. – Much Recommended

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NAME: Your Towns & Cities in World War Two, Cumbria At War 1939-45
FILE: R2784
AUTHOR: Ruth Mansergh
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 279
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War II, Second World War, Cumbria, 
ship yards, warships, civilians, soldiers, sailors, airmen, ARP, Land Army

ISBN: 1-47387-710-5

IMAGE: B2784.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y73s4j8s
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  The series is famous for producing a very affordable series 
of military and war history books with a high image content. This new book 
is a worthy addition to a well-established series.  The story of the towns, cities 
and regions of Britain during WWII demonstrates the total war nature of this 
costly conflict. - Much Recommended

The author has painted an affectionate picture of Cumbria at War. It may come as a revelation to 
many readers because Cumbria at first glance seems like a rural area of Northern England. In fact it 
has been frequently exposed to war and hosted a number of key warship building yards, military 
bases and vital food production.

Long before the Barnet Formula, Scotland had to actively seek financial support from England. 
Each year, Scottish tax collectors came over the Border at Berwick and rode South as far as York, 
collecting whitemail, in the form of Church Plate, coins and jewellery,  for the Scottish Treasury. 
The tax collectors then crossed to the English West coast and rode North, collecting blackmail, in 
the form of sheep and cattle, as payment for their time, riding through Cumbria, skirting the English 
garrison at Carlisle and passing back into Scotland at Gretna. In addition to the tax collecting raids, 
Cumbria was frequently disturbed by the almost continuous war between England and Scotland that 
only subsided when a Scottish King also became King of England. Then Scottish politicians managed 
to recoup their losses in the Belize Bubble by persuading England to agree an Act of Union with a 
single Parliament.

WWII introduced a whole new level of threat to a beautiful and peaceful part of the United Kingdom.

The author begins with the harbinger of war as the German Zeppelin flew low across Britain in 1936 
gathering intelligence on British war production sites, updating maps for future bombing raids. She 
then provides a comprehensive view of the important part Cumbria played in WWII, including a 
detailed look at the warships built in the Barrow Yard.

This is a poignant view of the momentous efforts, the determination of the population, the courage 
and bravery as they faced the fight against the German aggressor and then the challenge of finding 
normality after the war.