Your Towns & Cities in the Great War, Norfolk Coast in the Great War, King’s Lynn, Hunstanton, Sheringham, Cromer & Great Yarmouth

The publisher produces a number of fine series that provide valuable insights into history. The sad part of reviewing books is that time restricts the number of books that can be read and reviewed. As a result, the FIRE Project review team has not been able to review all of the titles in the local histories of WWI, taking only snapshots of the series. This new title is a delight and representative of the high standard achieved by the series. The text is built on thorough research and is very ably supported by a host of illustration – Very Highly Recommended.


http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Your Towns & Cities in the Great War, Norfolk Coast in the 
Great War, King's Lynn, Hunstanton, Sheringham, Cromer & Great 
Yarmouth
FILE: R2570
AUTHOR: Stephen Browning
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  224
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: England, Great Britain, East Coast, Norfolk, WWI, The Great 
War, World War1, World War I, First World War, fishing villages, 
coastal towns

ISBN: 1-47384-877-8

IMAGE: B2570.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ydz7gcwt
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The publisher produces a number of fine series that 
provide valuable insights into history. The sad part of reviewing 
books is that time restricts the number of books that can be read 
and reviewed. As a result, the FIRE Project review team has not been 
able to review all of the titles in the local histories of WWI, 
taking only snapshots of the series. This new title is a delight and 
representative of the high standard achieved by the series. The text 
is built on thorough research and is very ably supported by a host 
of illustration – Very Highly Recommended.

The title suggests that the history is restricted to a handful of 
coastal towns and villages. The author has done more than that by 
including some coverage of the inland areas, including the aircraft 
factory on Mousehold Heath, Norwich, that produced many of the famous 
Sopwith fighter designs that made such a contribution to the progress 
of the air war.

Norfolk is an interesting and at times strange part of the British 
Isles. It has been inhabited from the earliest times when a land 
bridge existed between the British Isles and Europe. It has long been 
a dependable area of agricultural production and for several 
centuries responsible for much of the wealth production of England, 
when wool was a valuable and profitable resource. At the same time, 
it attracted textile workers from the Low Countries and Worsted 
cloth is one famous product of Norfolk. It was also to be at the 
heart of the Agricultural Revolution that preceded and assisted the 
Industrial Revolution. For the factories to be built and staffed, the 
work force would be drawn from the countryside, but the demand for 
food and materials from the agricultural areas would increase. That 
made the Agricultural Revolution a critical precursor. Norfolk saw 
the introduction of the Four Course Rotation system that increased 
the fertility of the land, to increase the tonnage of crops. The new 
agricultural machines began a process that continues today, with 
progressively larger and more sophisticated machines allowing farm 
land to be managed by a shrinking number of people and still produce 
even greater tonnages of crops.

In Medieval times, Norwich was not just the capital of Norfolk, but 
the second city of England. Great Yarmouth grew wealthy on the back 
of wool production, exacting a heavy toll on all produce that passed 
through its port. King's Lynn was a vibrant trading port that was 
the entry into the English markets for the Hanseatic League, having 
very strong trading relationships with Scandinavia and the Baltic. 
The coastal fringe of Norfolk comprised many successful fishing 
villages and ports.

The most noticeable change to Norfolk was not to come until after 
WWII as the further mechanisation saw the dramatic changes in average 
farm size where the typical farm of pre-1945, of less than 50 acres, 
rapidly grew to averages of more than 3,000 acres, further 
depopulating the countryside. Even so, this book provides views of 
Norfolk that are remarkably unchanged today. Most villages and towns 
have grown but there is much remaining of the WWI appearances and 
the way of life.

Norfolk has always made a strong contribution to English, and then 
to British, interests in time of war. It has produced many soldiers 
and sailors, with Nelson as its most famous naval son, brought up on 
the North Norfolk coast. Great Yarmouth has been an important port 
and Nelson victualled his ships there before the cruise that 
culminated in his greatest victory at Trafalgar. However, WWI was to 
affect Norfolk more than any war in its long history. Shore 
bombardment by German warships and terror bombing by German airships 
brought the conflict very directly to the coastal towns of Norfolk. 
The population was mobilized in a way never before attempted and the 
loss of fine young men to war, particularly in the trenches of the 
Western Front, meant many empty places in the post-war Norfolk homes.

This is a delightful book and one that can be walked. The reader can 
start at King's Lynn and walk in stages round to Great Yarmouth. It 
is an interesting landscape with wide skies and variety.