Your Towns & Cities, Enfield In The Great War

The author, a retired policeman, has produced another book in the fine ‘Your Towns & Cities In The Great War’ series that has become rightly a very popular series. This is volume covers the life and times for Enfield, a town with a very special contribution to the British war effort – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Your Towns & Cities, Enfield In The Great War
FILE: R3005
AUTHOR: Stephen Wynn
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, WW1, World War I, World War 1, World War One, First World 
War, The Great War, war industry, Royal Armoury, Royal Fire Arms Factory, Lee 
Enfield,  anti-aircraft, German bombing Home Front, war work, nursing, hospitals, 
policing, 

ISBN: 1-47385-075-4

IMAGE: B3005.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yysbjao8
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The author, a retired policeman, has produced another book in the 
fine 'Your Towns & Cities In The Great War' series that has become rightly a very 
popular series. This is volume covers the life and times for Enfield, a town with a 
very special contribution to the British war effort – Highly Recommended.

The Royal Fire Arms Factory was vital to the British War effort. It was responsible for the manufacture of the standard infantry rifle of the period. This was the marriage of an American-designed bolt action to a barrel and fittings designed by the RFAF, the resulting weapon being produced in volume and in several versions by the British. The rifle was so good in the hands of a trained infantryman that the Germans thought they were facing machine guns when they met the British Expeditionary Force. It was a significant advance on the Lee Metford which preceded the smokeless powder Lee Enfield. The RFAF was active in the manufacture of small arms of all types and responsible for the Pattern Room that housed a unique collection of firearms from around the world, providing ideas for new weapons and manufacturing techniques.

Enfield was also home to a variety of other factories including new electronic workshops. To this support of the war, Enfield saw its sons signing up for the Army, the Royal Navy and the two air arms, the RFC and RNAS. This resulted in the award of medals for their service, including the Victoria Cross and the Military Cross. The women of Enfield stepped forward to fill jobs vacated by those volunteering for the Services and family life continued, facing the difficulties of war. As a high value target, Enfield received the attention of German airships and bomber aircraft. The fatalities included a woman killed during a bombing raid when she was struck by falling shrapnel from anti-aircraft fire.

The author has also covered the less commendable activities, including a baker accused of profiteering. This rounds the story into a warts and all account of the realities of war as they affected Enfield.