What Hitler’s Butler said 1934-1943

KB0154

This DVD provides on one disk a series of interviews with Karl Wilhelm Krause who was transferred from the German Navy to serve as Hitler’s valet. The second disk holds galleries and bonus film. Krause provides a very personal view of Hitler and recalls comments by leading Nazi Party members. This DVD provides on one disk a series of interviews with Karl Wilhelm Krause who was transferred from the German Navy to serve as Hitler’s valet. The second disk holds galleries and bonus film. Krause provides a very personal view of Hitler and recalls comments by leading Nazi Party members.

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NAME: What Hitler’s Butler said 1934-1943
CLASSIFICATION: Video, DVD, reviews
FILE: K0154
DATE: 060812
PRESENTER(S):
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword Digital
MEDIA: DVD x 2
FORMAT: Dual layer
RUNTIME: 88 minutes
PLAYERS: Personal Computer, Mac Computer, DVD Player
INTERNET: Optional
PRICE:
GENRE: Non-Fiction
SUBJECT: Hitler, personal view, butler, valet, 1934-1943
ISBN:
IMAGE: KB0154
VIDEO:
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/c3kehhu
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This DVD provides on one disk a series of interviews with Karl Wilhelm Krause who was transferred from the German Navy to serve as Hitler’s valet. The second disk holds galleries and bonus film. Krause provides a very personal view of Hitler and recalls comments by leading Nazi Party members. It demonstrates loyalty and suggests that many of the most unpleasant actions by the Nazis happened without Hitler being involved or aware. This DVD provides on one disk a series of interviews with Karl Wilhelm Krause who was transferred from the German Navy to serve as Hitler’s valet. The second disk holds galleries and bonus film. Krause provides a very personal view of Hitler and recalls comments by leading Nazi Party members. One of the great difficulties in understanding Germany and its leaders during this period is that propaganda from the Allies sought to portray Hitler as a monster, rather than as a very human and complex character who was responsible for a series of actions that can only be described as evil and unhuman. There are many parallels between Hitler and British national socialist Tony Blair. There is a lazy attitude to leadership, reliance on some odious supporters, a lack of attention to detail in some areas and great attention in others, a tendency to become involved in direct management of some situations and a casual attitude to the management of other situations. There is an ability to lie almost for the sake of lying and that this is most effective because there is an ability to be an actor taking a part and believing in the reality created by that part. In any political environment, as applied to the period of Nazi rule in Germany, the Leader can be divorced from some situations, either because he wishes to have deniability, or because his casual comments are taken by subordinates as a license to go out and do something dreadful. This runs through history and Henry II of England was engaged in a battle with the Church, as a rival power base, which he was determined to win. However, it is likely that when he was expressing his frustration with the Archbishop of Canterbury it may never have been intended as a license for his knights to go to Canterbury and hack down the Archbishop. Apart from the fact that the result was politically embarrassing, Henry may have genuinely not wanted Beckett killed. In the same way, Hitler was rabidly anti-Semitic, coming from a part of Austria that had a long tradition of anti-Semitism, but he on several occasions said that the State should have a policy on Jews, in the same way that it needed a policy on sewage, and not rely on personal bigotry. He identified anti-Semitism with political advantage and initially encouraged the expulsion of Jews from Germany, taking the opportunity to rob them of their wealth in the process. Once war had begun the option of robbing and expelling Jews became impractical and the policy turned to brutal slave labour and then to deliberate mass killings. Hitler might have been unaware of the detail of the genocide but there is a mass of evidence to demonstrate that he gave orders and was aware of at least the general results of the policy. Where Krause appears to paint Hitler in a more favourable light, there can be several reasons other than simple acceptance of the Nazi policies and veneration of the Leader. Krause was selected with others from the German Navy to be interviewed for the post of valet on the encouragement of Goering after Hitler forgot to pack a clean shirt on one of his early vote raising trips. Once selected, Krause was not permitted to wear German Navy uniform but had to wear either SS uniform or civilian clothes. How far he supported Nazi philosophy, beyond that of a typical German of the time is unclear, but he was not a Party member or an SA or SS recruit. He paints a human picture of his employer and there is the close relationship that is common between a master and a personal servant. He certainly saw Hitler at his most relaxed and the reality of a brutal national leader does not mean that the private person cannot appear as a normal human being away from the political spotlight. There are details of Hitler’s habit before the wartime period of going out incognito to a tea house or some other public place, accompanied only by Krause. What Krause describes may simply be the side of Hitler that took refuge from the role of a national leader. When propaganda offers a distorted image, it hides the other facets of an individual and some of Hitler’s mass murderers who ran the extermination camps could be ordinary family men once they left their place of work, in much the same way that anyone can present one face at whatever is their workplace and a very different face at home. Some one watching this DVD is free to draw their own conclusions in the same way that a Jury may during a trial. Krause offers some very important insights into Hitler and those around him. This is an absorbing series of interviews and backed by further information in the bonus films and private archive galleries.

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