Western Steam on Bristol and Exeter Lines

A delightful book with excellent illustration, mainly in full colour. This book covers the history of the Bristol and Exeter Lines from their inception to their new life as the longest British heritage line – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Western Steam on Bristol and Exeter Lines
FILE: R2701
AUTHOR: Peter Waller
PUBLISHER: Unique Books
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  96
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Steam railways, heritage lines, Bristol & Exeter Lines, 
Bristol and Exeter Railway, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Great Western 
Railway

ISBN: 978-0-9957493-0-6

IMAGE: B2701.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.comy99aqvo6
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A delightful book with excellent illustration, mainly 
in full colour. This book covers the history of the Bristol and 
Exeter Lines from their inception to their new life as the longest 
British heritage line – Highly Recommended.

This is a must read for all steam enthusiasts, but it is also a 
lovely coverage of British countryside.

From the beginnings of steam rail lines in Great Britain, there was 
an amazing and complex explosion of effort as a diverse collection 
of business interests sought to link every part of the British Isles 
by rail. There were competing rail companies, all busy laying their 
own unique lines, variation of technology and some worrying safety 
issues. By 1900, steam railways succeeded in linking every part of 
the British Isles and revolutionized society. Fresh produce was 
taken by rail from one end of Britain to the other. Local products 
found exciting new markets and people could travel greater distances, 
faster, in relative comfort and safety, at an affordable price. In 
the process the holiday industry was born. For the first time, 
workers could escape for a few days or weeks from the grime of their 
work day existence to the countryside and the coast.

After WWII the nationalizing zeal of the second Labour Government 
succeeded in destroying enterprise and one consequence was to be 
the butchering of the rail network during the late 1950s and 1960s. 
Small under-used lines were closed to save money but this made the 
situation worse because it required the population in those areas to 
switch to lorries and cars. Once a road vehicle user, the driver had 
little desire just to drive to a surviving main line railway to 
continue by train. Costs continued to rise, service deteriorated and 
road networks expanded.

The Bristol and Exeter Lines were fortunate that enthusiasts began 
to bring them back to life before bureaucrats managed to rip up rails 
and sell bits off without thought of any future needs. Today, the 
West Somerset Railway offers a unique length of track through some 
beautiful countryside with the operation of steam trains for tourist 
and enthusiast enjoyment.