Wellington’s Foot Guards at Waterloo, The Men Who Saved the Day Against Napoleon

A very nicely researched and presented account of the actions of the Foot Guards at Waterloo. The authors have supported their text with a full colour photo-plate section and with maps produced through the body of text. – Much Recommended

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NAME: Wellington's Foot Guards at Waterloo, The Men Who Saved the Day 
Against Napoleon 
FILE: R2805
AUTHOR: Robert Burnham, Ron McGuigan
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline books
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 380
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Battle of Waterloo, Foot Guards, Imperial Guards, Château 
d'Hougoumont, attrition, artillery, ad hoc fortifications, muskets, rifles

ISBN: 1-52670-988-4

IMAGE: B2805.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yxrm4aek
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   A very nicely researched and presented account of the 
actions of the Foot Guards at Waterloo. The authors have supported their 
text with a full colour photo-plate section and with maps produced through 
the body of text. -  Much Recommended

The Battle of Waterloo is one of the greatest and most reported in history. Still, important new 
books are released that cast fresh light onto the actions that made up the battle and include primary 
source material that has not been used before, often in the form of letters home, from those who 
were there, and from official despatches. There will also be claims about how and who lost the 
battle for the French, or won it for the Allies.

The Foot Guards were proven and trusted soldiers on whom Wellington knew he could count. As a 
result he used them in critical areas and they did not let him down. They withstood the French 
artillery pounding them, hoping they would break squares and make an easy target for French 
cavalry. The carnage was terrible but they stood and fought back.

At the Château d'Hougoumont the Foot Guards stood against a complete French Corps. This defence 
held up the French advance and contributed to buying time for the Prussians to arrive. Then, they
 made the most critical of all contributions to the battle when the French thought they were about to
 achieve victory and sent in the Imperial Guard to finish the British off. The Foot Guards rose up 
from their concealment and smashed the Imperial Guard. As Napoleon's most famous troops were 
forced into retreat, the French soldiers saw the end and began to break. The Prussians arrived and 
chased the fleeing French army down. Panic set in and a fleeing Napoleon had to fight his own 
soldiers to get over a bridge to avoid capture.

This book reads very well and is packed with information in the main text and in detail in the 
appendices.