Wellington and the British Army’s Indian Campaigns, 1798-1805

This compelling study illuminates a part of Arthur Wellesley’s military career that has been largely neglected by historians. The author has provided an absorbing account of Wellesley/Lord Wellington which shows how his actions in India had a significant effect on the development of the British Empire and events through to the modern era. Highly Recommended

NAME:    Wellington and the British Army's Indian Campaigns, 1798-1805
FILE: R3261
AUTHOR: Martin R Howard
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                           
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   French Revolutionary Wars, Napoleonic Wars, Royal Navy, sea power, 
Dash for Empire, Arthur Wellesley, Lord Wellington, General Lake, East India 
Company, John Company, Indian rulers

ISBN: 1-47389-446-8

PAGES: 308
IMAGE: B3261.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y3kzcpfr
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This compelling study illuminates a part of Arthur Wellesley's 
military career that has been largely neglected by historians.  The author has 
provided an absorbing account of Wellesley/Lord Wellington which shows how 
his actions in India had a significant effect on the development of the British 
Empire and events through to the modern era.   Highly Recommended


The career of Arthur Wellesley was extraordinary and he has rightly been lauded for his performance in Iberia and its part in the defeat of Napoleon. Equally, his achievement at Waterloo shaped European history. However, his actions in India were, if anything, even more important to the world because they shaped the development of the British Empire.

When we hear the rewritten history spouted by left wingers, we see a version of the British Empire at odds with the reality. Unlike Spain and Portugal, Britain never set out to convert the heathen world to Christianity, or to seek, as France, Germany and Russia did, world domination. Britain was set on exploration and trade. Its adventurer seaman set sail sometimes with royal backing and sometimes against the Monarch and Parliament. In their sailings, they found new lands and established ‘factories’ or trading outposts around the world. British traders exploited these discoveries to find new markets and Britain prospered as these markets fed materials into the Industrial Revolution which Britain had created. The Royal Navy was tasked with protecting the long trade routes and British shores. In India, as elsewhere, the British Crown granted monopolies to trader groups and they formed the impressive East India Company, forming their own army and navy to protect their interests. Their growing power and wealth created fortunes for their principles and officers, but also created some unwelcome activities, including the shipment of huge quantities of opium to China as a way of obtaining tea cheaply.

As the East India Company grew and prospered it came into conflict with French national interests and the need grew for the Royal Navy to station warships in the region and to transport British soldiers to form an army to block French attempts at expansion and domination.

Arthur Wellesley became known and the ‘sepoy general’ and the author has examined his victories, included the first hand accounts of those who were there and shown how the results of British success changed the world and shape much later events in Europe.

The very readable text is supported with some very interesting illustration, including a colour plate section.