Waterloo, The French Perspective

B1728

The author has written a thought provoking new study that is based on almost a hundred first hand French accounts and combined them with accounts from other sources. In the process, there is material to enriched well established accounts, providing fresh detail and new perspectives. This is a very worthy addition to the fund of knowledge already presented on the conflict that saw France relegated on the world stage and the advance of the British in founding a huge and unique Empire.

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NAME: Waterloo, The French Perspective
CLASSIFICATION: Book Reviews
FILE: R1728
DATE: 230512
AUTHOR: Andrew W Field
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 309
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non fiction
SUBJECT: French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, Napoleon, Blucher, Wellington. French perspective, 1815 Campaign
ISBN: 1-78159-043-5
IMAGE: B1728.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/c725qdl
LINKS: http://tinyurl.com/
DESCRIPTION: History is written by the victors, but the views of the defeated can be very important because they can become the cause of a new war. How brilliant Napoleon was as a military leader or as a national leader can be debated forever. Wellington met Napoleon on the field of battle for the first time at Waterloo and was disappointed. Instead of an innovative and brilliant general that Wellington had expected, he found only a general who was happy to expend the lives of his troops in a fight of attrition. In the event, circumstances combined to lead to the total defeat and route of the French, with Napoleon having to fight his own troops to secure for himself an escape route. How much of this can be explained by his poor health and the ageing of his Marshals and Imperial Guard can also be debated endlessly. Various French historians have attempted to present Waterloo as a battle won by Napoleon but stolen from him in an unexplained way in much the same way that other French historians make similar claims for defeats by the English in the 100 Years War. The reality is that battle favours the prepared mind and the general who can seize opportunities quickly. The margin for defeat or victory can be very narrow. The author has written a thought provoking new study that is based on almost a hundred first hand French accounts and combined them with accounts from other sources. In the process, there is material to enriched well established accounts, providing fresh detail and new perspectives. This is a very worthy addition to the fund of knowledge already presented on the conflict that saw France relegated on the world stage and the advance of the British in founding a huge and unique Empire.

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