Wartime Standard Ships

The author has a special interest in commercial ships of all types and he has put this experience to the subject of Standard Ships. There is a wealth of photographic illustration that strongly complements an able text – Most Recommended.


http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Wartime Standard Ships
FILE: R2609
AUTHOR: Nick Robins
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth Publishing
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  177
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Merchant shipping, Merchant Navy, Mercantile marine, 
cargo ships, passenger ships, troop ships, ammunition ships, MAC 
ships, CAM ships, Royal Navy, WWII, World War 2, World War II, 
Second World War, Great War, First World War, WWI, World War 1, 
World War I, ship building, technology, construction methods.

ISBN: 1-84832-376-6

IMAGE: B2609.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ya3nc5l5
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The author has a special interest in commercial ships 
of all types and he has put this experience to the subject of 
Standard Ships. There is a wealth of photographic illustration 
that strongly complements an able text  – Most Recommended.

In the accounts of war at the time, and later by historians, there 
are parts of the story that are leapt over or simply ignored, even 
though they are a critical part of the story. Merchant ships fall 
into this category. Most naval histories briefly mention a tanker 
exploding or a cargo ship sinking during an attack by aircraft or 
submarines, concentrating on the escort vessels and their battle 
with the enemy. Perhaps it is understandable that the fighting 
teeth seize the attention, rather than the plodding and vulnerable 
vessels carrying crucial cargoes, without which the whole war 
effort would fail. In the North Atlantic all vessels on both sides 
had to battle the weather and sea conditions that often claimed 
casualties directly. Large numbers of seamen were adrift in 
lifeboats, slowly dying, or choking in the layer of oil floating 
on the sea surface, sometimes burning.

The reality of the Battle of the Atlantic and the Russian convoys 
is that the warships are very important in reducing losses, but 
equally important was the battle to build replacement merchant 
ships and recruit and train their crews. Without this huge effort, 
the advances in convoy escort and anti-submarine warfare would 
have amounted to little. The great success story in two World Wars 
was how standard ship designs enabled shipyards, often with many 
women workers who were completely new to heavy industry, to turn 
out more new ships that the enemy was sinking old ships. The new 
vessels were not only turned out in great numbers, but they were 
also a significant improvement on previous designs. They were 
faster, cleaner, larger, less vulnerable and carried larger cargoes.

The story that unfolds in this excellent new book is of how 
shipbuilders and designers rose to a major challenge and 
revolutionized shipbuilding for all time. This is an important 
story and an important book of reference that reads well and 
provides fresh insights.