Voices From The Past, The Siege of Sevastopol 1845-1855, The War in the Crimea Told Through Newspaper Reports, Official Documents and the Accounts of Those Who Were There

The author has already produced a number of successful books reviewing aspects of the Crimean War. This new book is part of the popular Voices From The Past – Much Recommended.


http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Voices From The Past, The Siege of Sevastopol 1845-1855, 
The War in the Crimea Told Through Newspaper Reports, Official 
Documents and the Accounts of Those Who Were There 
FILE: R2640
AUTHOR: Anthony Dawson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  269
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: French Army, British Army, Russian Army, Russian expansion, 
Franco-British Alliance, Crimea, Black Sea, siege warfare, logistics

ISBN: 1-84832-957-1

IMAGE: B2640.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y7jpwf8t
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The author has already produced a number of successful 
books reviewing aspects of the Crimean War. This new book is part 
of the popular Voices From The Past  – Much Recommended.

The Voices From The Past series has proved very popular with 
historians and enthusiasts because it is primary source information. 
There is a photo plate section that provides some interesting images 
with generous captions, making into a fascinating study of a war 
which has several direct lessons for today.

As the original source material shows, the war was difficult and 
contained many weaknesses in the Franco-British Alliance. This was 
perhaps to be expected because it was the first time in a thousand 
years where English/British soldiers were to fight alongside French 
soldiers, all the more remarkable because the last French defeat, 
by the British at Waterloo was in living memory, and both armies 
included officers and men who had fought each other at Waterloo. 
Just to make the situation more challenging, the Allies had to bring 
their reinforcements, ammunition and supplies through the 
Mediterranean, through the narrow Straight with Turkey on  both sides, 
and into the Black Sea, where Russia had home ports and warships. The 
Allied convoys then had to unload in the single available port which 
was under threat of being cut off from the British and French armies.

The Crimea was the last war the British fought under the old methods 
of commissioning officers, where social rank and money was more 
important than merit. This old system led to a number of embarrassing 
failures of which the Charge of the Light Brigade was the most 
notable, being an action that was misdirected, but still achieved 
tactical victory, only to be turned into failure by a lack of support 
to consolidate the initial gains.

This book contains many different prespectives, a number of which 
have not been aired together before.