Victoria Crosses on the Western Front, Continuation of the German 1918 Offences, 24th March – 24th July 1918

The author, a former soldier, is a member of the Guild of Battlefield Guides and this work is the result of decades of research. Each VC award for the period and battlefield has been meticulously researched, set within the strategic and tactical context and well illustrated – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: Victoria Crosses on the Western Front, Continuation of the German 1918 
Offences, 24th March - 24th July 1918
FILE: R2942
AUTHOR: Paul Oldfield
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 775
PRICE: £40.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War One, World War 1, World War I, WWI, First World War, The 
Great War, Western Front, trench warfare, land forces, exceptional bravery, war of 
attrition

ISBN: 1-47382-710-8

IMAGE: B2942.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y2tq62tr
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The author, a former soldier, is a member of the Guild of Battlefield 
Guides and this work is the result of decades of research. Each VC award for the 
period and battlefield has been meticulously researched, set within the strategic 
and tactical context and well illustrated  –   Most Highly Recommended

The author has produced a detailed account of the VC holders from the period. He 
started by wondering as he toured the battlefields about the soldiers who were 
decorated for their exceptional actions and, in particular, those who received the 
ultimate award of a Victoria Cross. This award has been most sparing awarded for 
the most exceptional acts of courage, with a high proportion being awarded during 
the Great War. Researching the basic details of the award to each recipient is a matter 
of scholarship in reading through the official records but produces a narrow view of 
the recipient and rarely indicates the strategic and tactical context, or even the 
environment in which the act of courage under fire took place. 

Remarkably little has been written about VCs in general and most often as an 
anecdote in illustration of a study of a battle. The author began his research as part 
of the development of his own knowledge to become a better Guild of Battlefield 
Guides member and to provide a reference work that would be useful to those 
visiting battlefields. As the work progressed it became a comprehensive work for 
the armchair reader, not least in that a reader would need very large pockets and 
stamina to take it on a battlefield tour. It is of course ideal as information to read 
before undertaking a battlefield tour and an excellent work to read after the tour, 
adding depth to what has been observed and learned.

What really makes this book stand out from other studies of bravery awards is the 
depth of information and the relationship of all of the elements making a moving 
and inspirational story for each award. There are photographs of recipients in each 
entry, but there are also maps and photographs of the terrain, the buildings and 
memorials. It will prove very valuable to historians but it is very readable and the 
author has set the scene with details of the German last ditch offensive. This will 
make the book extremely valuable for anyone with any interest in land warfare and 
the Great War.

The German offensive of mid 1918 was fuelled by the freeing of troops, who had 
been fighting on the Eastern Front, by the Soviet desire to fight the Germans no 
more as they engaged in their civil war across the vast country of Russia. The Allied 
cause was aided by an influx of fresh US troops as America entered the war and built 
its army. The fighting was fierce and the number of VCs awarded to British soldiers 
is a fair indication of the scale and intensity of the battles.