Valentine Baker’s Heroic Stand at Tashkessen 1877, A Tarnished British Soldier’s Glorious Victory

The Nineteenth Century saw a number of British naval and army officers follow disgrace with glorious service for a foreign power. This book covers Baker’s lows and highs to his triumph at Tashkessen, but it also includes some brief and fascinating views of his family – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Valentine Baker's Heroic Stand at Tashkessen 1877, A Tarnished 
British Soldier's Glorious Victory
FILE: R2595
AUTHOR: Frank Jastrzembski
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  202
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Russo-Turkish War, British Army, Ottoman Army, Foreign 
Enlistment, land warfare, Nineteenth Century

ISBN: 1-47386-680-4

IMAGE: B2595.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ybplv8uh
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The Nineteenth Century saw a number of British naval 
and army officers follow disgrace with glorious service for a foreign 
power.  This book covers Baker's lows and highs to his triumph at 
Tashkessen, but it also includes some brief and fascinating views of 
his family – Highly Recommended.

During the Nineteenth Century there was a fluidity that has now 
largely evaporated. By the end of WWII, boundaries between States 
became clear and modern communications and information systems have 
made it considerably more difficult for an individual to make a new 
life in the way that it was possible in the Nineteenth Century. 
Thomas Cochrane was a brilliant frigate commander during the 
Napoleonic Wars and a great naval warfare thinker. Not the character 
we might expect to be disgraced. He was however an adventurer who 
became a Member of Parliament and a business man. It was in politics 
and business that he came unstuck and had to flee Britain. He was 
appointed to command the navies of Chile, Peru and Brazil during 
their fight for independence. At sea he again earned a reputation 
that any naval commander would be proud of and he was eventually 
taken back into the Royal Navy and promoted to Admiral.  Baker was 
disgraced in Army service, dismissed and jailed. Like Cochrane he 
sought employment outside Britain, although in his case he was aided 
by the Prince of Wales (King Edward VII) who secured an appointment 
for him in Egypt, commanding Ottoman troops. Where Cochrane is still 
remembered in South America and Britain, Baker has been forgotten, 
even though he was taken as an example of tactical control and 
command of troops by his contemporaries after his victory at 
Tashkessen. Cochrane of course was helped to immortality in two ways. 
In South America, ships and places have been named for him, and in 
literature he is the model frigate captain who inspired a small 
group of best selling novelists and appears in their books as part 
of their heroes.

Baker was not always lucky in combat and he is more likely to be 
remembered for the charges brought against him, his imprisonment 
and a less successful battle, leading Egyptian troops in the Sudan. 
The courage and leadership he displayed at Tashkessen must have 
always been a part of him, bursting out in a spectacular manner at 
Tashkessen. He fought there in a manner worthy of the Spartans. 
His 3,000 Ottoman troops were facing a Russian force of 25,000. 
His brilliant tactics and disposition of his troops enabled his 
force to achieve an impossible victory.

The author has crafted an absorbing tale which is supported by some 
interesting images. Not a story to miss.