Tyneside Scottish, 20th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd (service) Battalions Northumberland Fusiliers

B2104

This is a very interesting story, with many fine images through the text, all in monochrome.

One of the most curious aspects of the British Army is the nature of its units and their relationship. The basic regiments have been recruited from relatively small geographic areas, most frequently English Counties. In Scotland similar units were raised on much the same basis, although there was a clan element in several Scottish regiments. The result was that regiments often gave way to the particular fashions of the time and the likings of the Colonel. For some reason, several English regiments adopted kilts and include few if any Scots in their ranks. That may not in itself been so strange because the kilt and tartans was largely a romantic invention of the Victorians. The authors have traced the origins and formation of one of those kilted English regiments and its conduct in the Great War.

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NAME: Tyneside Scottish, 20th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd (service) Battalions Northumberland Fusiliers
DATE: 021214
FILE: R2104
AUTHOR: Graham Stewart, John Sheen
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 402
PRICE: £30.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, First World War, Great War, Western Front, trench warfare, artillery, kilts, infantry, Northumberland
ISBN: 1-47382-301-3
IMAGE: B2104.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ltojng2
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: One of the most curious aspects of the British Army is the nature of its units and their relationship. The basic regiments have been recruited from relatively small geographic areas, most frequently English Counties. In Scotland similar units were raised on much the same basis, although there was a clan element in several Scottish regiments. The result was that regiments often gave way to the particular fashions of the time and the likings of the Colonel. For some reason, several English regiments adopted kilts and include few if any Scots in their ranks. That may not in itself been so strange because the kilt and tartans was largely a romantic invention of the Victorians. The authors have traced the origins and formation of one of those kilted English regiments and its conduct in the Great War.

This is a very interesting story, with many fine images through the text, all in monochrome.

Very few of those serving in the Tyneside Scottish were even of Scottish descent. Most were drawn from the villages and pits across Northumberland. They fought with determination and courage in a terrible war of attrition.

The story is not just of battles and a regiment, but of the people who served and some of whom were detached to other units. There is a nominal Roll of Officers and entries for those who received Gallantry Awards, including a photograph and details of the award. This is a fine piece of research that will be enjoyed particularly by enthusiasts and those with family in or from Northumberland.

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