The World of the Battleship, The Design Careers of Capital Ships of the World’s Navies 1880-1990

This is a highly original work that covers battleships across the World’s navies. The Line of Battle ship emerged as the principle naval weapon that was the key to naval engagements for some three hundred years. The steam powered successors were to last little more than 100 years and were replaced as THE capital ship by the aircraft carrier in WWII. – Strongly Recommended

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: The World of the Battleship, The Design  Careers of Capital Ships of the 
World's Navies 1880-1990
FILE: R2771
AUTHOR: Bruce Taylor
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword, Seaforth Publishing
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 440
PRICE: £40.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Armoured battleships, team power, coal-fired, oil-fired, pre-Dreadnought, 
Dreadnought, heavy guns, missiles, spotter aircraft, radar, helicopters

ISBN: 978-1-84832-178-6

IMAGE: B2771.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y9hprmbz
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  This is a highly original work that covers battleships across 
the World's navies.  The Line of Battle ship emerged as the principle naval 
weapon that was the key to naval engagements for some three hundred years. 
The steam powered successors were to last little more than 100 years and were 
replaced as THE capital ship by the aircraft carrier in WWII. -  Strongly 
Recommended

Seaforth Publishing is a highly respected naval history publisher, recognized for the original and 
impeccable histories that it has published. This new book is a worthy addition to the portfolio.

This is a weighty volume with a host of excellent images on gloss paper. A vessel from each of 
twenty-one navies ha been selected for in-depth specialist coverage. This provides unique and 
thorough presentations of technology, origin, design, structure, organisation, career and cultural 
impact of each ship. This is an extremely important book on its subject and likely to become a 
principle information resource on its subjects.

When the steel, steam-powered battleship appeared it marked a major change in naval power and 
history. Previous battleships had been built by craftsmen from wood and the concession to the
 Industrial Revolution was the production of new guns of a much more uniform quality than had 
previously been possible. However, from the Great Castle ships of the early 16th Century to the 
wooden battleships employed in the Crimea campaigns they were remarkably familiar. Designs 
evolved. Between them and the steel battleship, were a number of hybrid designs where steam power 
was available as an alternative to the full sailing rig and steel plating was added to the timber hull. 
The battleship of 1880 was a testament to the Industrial Revolution. It dispensed with a sailing rig to 
rely entirely on its coal-fired steam engines. It mounted its main guns in barbets or turrets and it was 
symbolic of both power and wealth. Many battleships were built in British yards for other navies and 
many heavy guns were produced in Britain. 

It must have seemed that naval warfare had taken a new form to last another three hundred years or 
more, but the arrival of the turn of the Century HMS Dreadnought, with its powerful armament and 
steam turbine power, changed the game again after only two decades. From that point a battleship was 
either a dreadnought or a pre-dreadnought. In this form the battleship enjoyed a similarly short life with 
the last full fleet battle being fought between the British Fleet and the German Fleet at Jutland in 1916. 
The aircraft carrier had arrived and was soon the new capital ship. Battleships continued on in service 
and were still impressive vessels, but their days were numbered. After WWI, most existing battleships 
underwent major refits that saw them embark their own aircraft to spot for the guns. WWII demonstrated 
their vulnerability and anti-aircraft armament was dramatically increased, with the spotter aircraft starting 
to be replaced by radar.

From 1945, the battleship was largely used for shore bombardment and numbers began to rapidly 
reduce. The last hurray was for a handful of battleships that retained their big guns but now also carried
 missiles

This book tells the story very well and provides unique comparison of vessels across the 21 navies.