The Voyage of the Beagle, Darwin’s extraordinary adventure aboard FitzRoy’s famous survey ship

B2291

It is difficult to think of any single voyage that has changed the world in the way that the voyage of the Beagle managed. This really was an extraordinary adventure to the far side of the world. The story is told in an engaging style and supported by some outstanding illustration. This is a form of publishing that Conway has developed into an art form. The quality of production is excellent and this is a book that should appeal to so many different readers. There is the appeal of the voyage as a maritime interest and there is much to appeal to those interested in nature and the natural world, but this is also a story that appeals to philosophy and theology. Highly recommended.

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://brn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

http://ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: The Voyage of the Beagle, Darwin’s extraordinary adventure aboard FitzRoy’s famous survey ship
DATE: 231015
FILE: R2291
AUTHOR: James Taylor
PUBLISHER: Bloomsbury, Conway
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 192
PRICE: £18.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: survey vessels, creationism, evolution, survival, anthropology, exploration, maritime survey, British Empire, Royal Navy, Darwin, observation, sketches
ISBN: 978-1-84486-327-3
IMAGE: B2291.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/njsq9cu
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: It is difficult to think of any single voyage that has changed the world in the way that the voyage of the Beagle managed. This really was an extraordinary adventure to the far side of the world. The story is told in an engaging style and supported by some outstanding illustration. This is a form of publishing that Conway has developed into an art form. The quality of production is excellent and this is a book that should appeal to so many different readers. There is the appeal of the voyage as a maritime interest and there is much to appeal to those interested in nature and the natural world, but this is also a story that appeals to philosophy and theology. Highly recommended.

British seamen had sailed out on lengthy voyages of exploration for several hundred years, but the early to mid 19th Century saw a great increase during the dash to Empire. With the ending of the Napoleonic Wars, Britain was left with no real opponent, but with a huge opportunity to expand power and trade. With the increasing size of the British merchant fleet and the need to protect it and the sea-lanes, there was also a need to increase the amount of maritime survey to identify the risks and opportunities of particular sea routes. In sending out survey vessels, the Royal Navy provided passage for a selection of people who were interested of expanding knowledge of lands and flora and fauna. Artists joined the voyages and sketched anything they saw, often in outstanding sketches and drawings. New species of animals, plants and fishes were discovered, sketched, and examples collected. The amount of information being collected was massive and some of it was not fully studied and assessed for many years.

Amongst this fraternity of researchers, Darwin stood out alone. He developed theory of the origin of species that was controversial and continues to generate fierce debate at many levels, although it has become an accepted wisdom that challenges the claims of so many religions. Today, it can be very difficult to understand the views of society in the middle 19th Century, particularly the frequently uncomfortable relationship between science and religion. In that age, the origins of man were believed to be only a few thousand years distant and that man was created by a supreme being. We now know that there were highly advanced civilizations that pre-date the Ancient Egyptians and each year it seems that the origins of man move back a few hundred thousand years as new discoveries of ancient bones turn previously held assumptions on their heads. Darwin was therefore developing theories in an age of complacent confidence and it is hardly surprising that he was seen as a heretic in many parts of the scientific community.

During the 19th Century, science was still practised by religious believers and accepted scientific belief and religious beliefs were closely interwoven. After Darwin science began to replaced established religious beliefs and many countries became firmly secular. That has been hailed as proof that science is impatial and all-powerful, but the growth of the cult of global warming in the 21st Century suggests that large parts of science are anything but impartial and that belief continues to block impartial scientific experiment and proof.

Without his adventure on the Beagle, Darwin might never have been inspired to develop a revolutionary theory on how life has developed on Earth and how external factors have led to species adapting to exploit environments and habitats. There is some debate about whether he developed a truly new understanding of life and there continues to be significant debate about the drivers for change, evolution and revolution. There are still many people who wish to believe that man is a unique creature created by God, and with everything else being built around Him for His benefit. Creationists just don’t give up that easily.