The Trial of Adolf Hitler, The Beer Hall Putsch and the Rise of Nazi Germany

This book details the rise of Nazism from the Beer Hall Putsch and subsequent trial. When Hitler was put on trial for the attempted Beer Hall Putsch it was the making of the Nazi Party, providing international publicity for a previously minor Bavarian political Party – Much Recommended.


http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: The Trial of Adolf Hitler, The Beer Hall Putsch and the Rise 
of Nazi Germany
FILE: R2691
AUTHOR: David King
PUBLISHER: PAN Macmillan
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  455
PRICE: £9.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: NSDP, Nazi Party, Adolf Hitler, Ludendorff, Munich, 
insurrection, Bavaria, Rise of Nazism, trial, prison, Landsberg 
Prison

ISBN: 978-1-447-25115-6

IMAGE: B2691.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ycnwnkra
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This book details the rise of Nazism from the Beer 
Hall Putsch and subsequent trial. When Hitler was put on trial for 
the attempted Beer Hall Putsch it was the making of the Nazi 
Party, providing international publicity for a previously minor 
Bavarian political Party  – Much Recommended.

Great events can often emerge from the apparently inconsequential 
minor footnotes to history. A huge volume of publications has been 
dedicated to Adolf Hitler, the Nazi Party, The Holocaust, and World 
War II, but surprisingly little has been written about the way in 
which an obscure Bavarian political Party managed to become a pan- 
German political Party and rise to power, with control of Germany, 
leading to a terrible war and an industrial scale genocide program. 
Hitler was a junior NCO during WWI, who had achieved nothing before 
that war and was sinking into total obscurity. He held extreme 
political views but that was relative. In post-war Germany his anti- 
Semitism and anti-Communism was not much different from the views of 
a great many Germans. Widespread in the 1920s was the view in Germany 
that they had been betrayed by the Jews and the Communists and had 
not really been defeated in war. It was remarkably similar to the 
denial of the British Remoaners after they were defeated in a 
national referendum on Membership of the European Union that had 
been built on Nazi principles. When people take for granted that 
they are going to win, it can come as a very nasty shock when they 
are soundly beaten. There is an overwhelming desire to find 
scapegoats who can be blamed for the defeat. The most extraordinary 
and transparently dishonest claims can be eagerly embraced by the 
losers. In this corrosive atmosphere, Germans looked for anyone who 
was prepared to reverse the loss. Initially, Hitler was not highly 
rated as a speaker by other politicians, and many thought him odd 
and even unbalanced, but he persevered and forced his way to 
leadership of the NSDP which was a small and obscure Bavarian 
political Party, one of many that mixed socialism, fascism and 
denial into a dangerous cocktail. Hitler won support from a number 
of people who were regarded as German war heroes. Goering and Hess 
were fighter pilots, Goering having taken over the Richthofen Flying 
Circus after Baron von Richthofen had been shot down and killed. 
General Ludendorff, who had been a reckless general, was another 
German war hero highly regarded by many. These individuals gave 
Hitler and the NSDP a layer of almost respectability and helped to 
grow the membership. However, the NSDP was fighting for recognition 
in Bavaria and not winning enough support to win elections. Hitler 
decided to stage a putsch in Munich which was theatrical, almost 
comic. He failed to win over the police and soldiers and his attempt 
rapidly failed. In Germany, where heavily armed gangs, the Black 
Reichswehr, roamed the country attacking Communists, the putsch 
might have failed to make headlines outside Bavaria. As it was, 
the authorities decided to put Hitler and his cronies on trial and 
managed to appoint a judge who was sympathetic to the NSDP. The 
result was that journalists from all over the world flocked to 
Bavaria to cover the trial, giving the NSDP massive publicity. The 
judge awarded Hitler and his fellow accused a token period of 
imprisonment in Landsberg Prison. There, he used his time writing 
Mein Kampf which became the bible of the Nazis, the plan for world 
domination and a major revenue earner for Hitler when he came to 
power in Germany through the ballot box and made the Reich buy 
copies to give to every couple when they married. The author has 
done a very good job of tracing the events that turned a minor 
individual into a powerful national leader who brought world war 
once more to cause massive destruction that affected virtually 
every nation to some extent and killed millions. The research is
 extensive and the writing style compelling. This will become one 
of the key books on the rise of Nazism and deserves to be 
longlisted for the JQ Wingate Prize.