The Telegraph, The D Day Landings

This important book has been reprinted for the 75th Anniversary of the D-Day Landings. The author, a former soldier, who survived Japanese hospitality including a period working the mines of Japan, was Senior Lecturer at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and a prolific writer of military history – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: The Telegraph, The D Day Landings
FILE: R2908
AUTHOR: Philip Warner
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 309
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, European 
Theatre, Second Front, D-Day, D-Day landings, Normandy landings, Mulberry 
Harbour, amphibious assault, air superiority, landing craft, landing ships, battleships, 
shore bombardment, bunkers, Atlantic Wall, gun emplacements, airborne forces,
 French Resistance

ISBN: 1-52678-416-4

IMAGE: B2908.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yxj58vga
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This important book has been reprinted for the 75th Anniversary of
 the D-Day Landings. The author, a former soldier, who survived Japanese 
hospitality including a period working the mines of Japan, was Senior Lecturer 
at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and a prolific writer of military 
history –   Most Highly Recommended

This book was first published in 1980 by William Kimber, and then republished in 
2004 and 2019 by Pen & Sword. This edition has been published to commemorate 
the 75th Anniversary of the D-Day Landings, a date that has produced a wealth of 
new books and reprints. If the reader can only justify buying a single book on D-Day, 
this must be that book.

The author has benefited from his own experiences as a soldier and from training 
new generations of officers for the British Army. He has used first hand accounts 
and captured the many facets of D-Day, its preparation, execution and aftermath, no 
mean feat for an epic event that may never be matched by future conflict.

We can look back now, knowing the success of this mammoth amphibious landing, 
and we can visit the battlegrounds, see the remaining parts of fortifications, the drop 
zones of airborne forces and even still see the remains of the artificial harbours that 
have withstood the pounding of the sea for three quarters of a century. For those 
living at the time it all looked very different.

D-Day is often referred to as the Second Front to the First Front of the German 
Soviet combat. It was certainly how Stalin saw it when he claimed a lack of effort 
on the part of his Allies. Of course this is not accurate. We can debate which of four 
fronts was the Second Front ahead of D-Day. It can be argued that the First Front 
was the Battle of the Atlantic, including the British Arctic convoys that heroically 
fought their way to the Russian ports with the weapons and materials that helped the 
Red Army survive the German assault. The start of the Battle of the Atlantic just 
pre-dates the start of the RAF's strategic bombing campaign that also took much of 
the weight off the Red Army, by slowing German production expansion and the 
development of new weapons, and by drawing back to Germany the 88mm and 
120mm heavy anti-aircraft guns that could otherwise have been deployed against 
the Soviet Frontal Aviation and against Soviet armour. On land there were two fronts 
that pre-dated the D-Day Landings and provided the experience and boost to morale 
that made D-Day possible. 

In North Africa, the British and Commonwealth troops fought a very hard war 
against the Italians and Germans. Often starved of resources to prop up other theatres, 
the 8th Army fought against an increasing German armoured force and its aviation 
support. Every German tank, bomber and fighter deployed to North Africa was one 
less vital resource that would have been directed against the Soviets. Once the British, 
with the American Torch Landings, had destroyed the German and Italian forces in 
North Africa, the way was open to launch a new front against Sicily and Italy at a 
time when the resources were not available to launch a direct assault on the French 
coast. Torch provided the experiences of landing a major force on open enemy 
beaches. This experience was developed by the landings on Sicily and then on the 
mainland of Italy, including the use of airborne forces in numbers to support the 
amphibious landings. It also provided the opportunity to test new equipment and 
see how the Germans reacted to amphibious assault on their prepared defences. The
 result was that large scale rehearsals for the most dangerous beach landings on the 
French Coast helped to prepare the Overlord forces and continued to take Germans 
resources away from their Eastern Front and the Red Army. As the long hard fight 
up the Italian coasts continued past D-Day, the armies in Italy continued to divert 
German resources from Normandy and the Eastern Front.

Even with the sum of the Battle of the Atlantic, the strategic bombing of Germany, 
the Mediterranean Front and the Eastern Front, D-Day was still a huge risk. The 
Allied troops had to land on open beaches against well-prepared German positions 
with tough dug-in gun batteries and infantry. Any force landing on an enemy beach 
is at a serious disadvantage and the critical point is the first 48 hours when the 
attackers gain a foothold and then break out from their bridgehead.

This book tells the story in depth and captures the attitudes and hopes of people who 
were there. It also very effectively captures the epic nature of D-Day, a battle on a 
scale never before attempted.