The Sniper Anthology, Snipers of the Second World War

Produced from the contributions of leading specialists in the field, this book provides the most faceted study of snipers during WWII. The sniper of WWII descended from the earliest shooters, firing from places of concealment and, more recently, from the snipers of WWI who were the scourge of the trenches. – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: The Sniper Anthology, Snipers of the Second World War
FILE: R3143
AUTHOR: Adrian Gilbert, Tom C McKenney,Dan Mills, Roger Moorhouse, Tim 
Newark, Martin Pegler, Charles W Sasser, Mark Spicer, Leroy Thompson, John B 
Tonkin
PUBLISHER: frontline books, Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £9.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:  WWII, World War II, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, 
snipers, riflemen, marksmen, rifles, custom rifles, sights, scope sights, telescopic 
sights, ammunition, hand loaded ammunition, long range shooting, sniper teams

ISBN: 1-52676-069-X
PAGES: 206
IMAGE: B3143.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/ts4579s
DESCRIPTION: Produced from the contributions of leading specialists in the field, 
this book provides the most faceted study of snipers during WWII. The sniper of 
WWII descended from the earliest shooters, firing from places of concealment 
and, more recently, from the snipers of WWI who were the scourge of the 
trenches. – Highly Recommended.

In the early days of firearms, the sniper was using a weapon with limited range and 
accuracy, requiring him to find a place of concealment close to the target. In that he 
was following archers who were tasked with taking out high value targets. When 
James the Bastard, half brother of Mary Queen of Scots, was assassinated by a sniper 
using a hackbut and stone bullet, the shooter was firing from concealment less than 
50 metres away from his target. 

By the Napoleonic Wars, the art of sniping had advanced, the Baker rifle giving 
British Army 'Chosen Men' a significant advantage. The Baker rifle achieved a range 
and level of accuracy well beyond what the musket could offer. It had a lower rate of 
fire and required the user to be carefully selected and trained. In effect, the Baker 
rifles were carefully selected from those shipped out to the troops and partnered with 
soldiers who, in the main, were skirmishers and reconnaissance troops from Light 
Companies. They proved very successful in Portugal and Spain with Wellington's 
Army and were frequently used to take out French officers and NCOs, leaving French 
units without the commanders to engage the main British Army and its muskets in 
close combat.

By WWI, snipers had evolved further, but were typically armed with the same 
standard bolt-action rifles used by other troops and usually with standard iron sights. 
In most cases, the more effective shooters were used from the trenches to take out 
any soldier who put his head above the parapet. That changed during WWII with all 
armies using snipers to take out high value targets and targets of opportunity.

Usually, they were firing from concealment and using standard issue rifles, although 
the firearms may have been carefully selected from available stock. The sniper was 
usually carefully selected for his marksmanship and trained in the art of firing with 
precision from concealment at extended range. In the siege of Stalingrad Soviet 
snipers proved highly effective and the Germans responded by employing their own 
snipers. In these contests, the snipers were often operating on their own as hunters and 
the game rifle was often used in place of the standard army issue, equipped with a 
telescopic sight and using carefully selected or hand loaded ammunition.

The team of authors has covered an extensive selection of facets of the snipers 
working during WWII. Although modest in size, this volume contains a mine of 
information and good illustration in support.