The Secret World of the Victorian Lodging House

B2136

The publisher has been expanding a range of books covering topics from Victorian England. This new book compares well with others in the series and provides yet one more set of insights into Victorian society. The industrial revolution and the rapid expansion of Empire brought great riches to the British Isles, but it also saw people drawn from agriculture to the industries and towns, where many lived in appalling poverty. Many turned to drink and opium. The author has provided a graphic view of the Victorian Lodging House and the sights, sounds and smells that surrounded it. Historical research and imagination are combined to present a compelling image of the joys and sorrows of Victorian life.

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NAME: The Secret World of the Victorian Lodging House
DATE: 070215
FILE: R2136
AUTHOR: Joseph O’Neill
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 171
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: 19th Century, Victorian England, working class, cheap housing, shared housing, Jack the Ripper, gas light, fog, poor areas, White Chapel, Mr Whicher, policing, poverty
ISBN: 1-78159-393-0
IMAGE: B2136.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/nx8qpbp
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The publisher has been expanding a range of books covering topics from Victorian England. This new book compares well with others in the series and provides yet one more set of insights into Victorian society. The industrial revolution and the rapid expansion of Empire brought great riches to the British Isles, but it also saw people drawn from agriculture to the industries and towns, where many lived in appalling poverty. Many turned to drink and opium. The author has provided a graphic view of the Victorian Lodging House and the sights, sounds and smells that surrounded it. Historical research and imagination are combined to present a compelling image of the joys and sorrows of Victorian life.

The term ‘lodging house’ has been applied to a wider range of accommodation than that brought to life in this book. The wealthy male could enjoy the London Club as accommodation away from home. The coaching inn provided temporary accommodation for travellers, and there were hotels, but the lodging house was a peculiarly Victorian institution than provided affordable accommodation, mainly for the working class.

There were respectable lodging houses in most of the towns that provided similar accommodation but aimed to provide clean and respectable accommodation for single people who would regard themselves as part of the middle classes. Some were twinned with Temperance Restaurants and catered for those who had signed the Pledge to refrain from alcohol. They differed from the majority of working class lodging houses that were often dens of iniquity, particularly in East London, where the activities of Jack the Ripper brought that type of lodging to the attention of a shocked and intrigued British population.

The main purpose of the Victorian lodging house was to provide somewhere as a base for all those who were drawn to the cities but passed on through. There were the thousands who came to work on canals, railways and sewage systems. Hard work that paid well but was transitory. Some catered more for the older person or those who had fallen on hard times but avoided the Work House.

The author has painted a strong and colourful picture of the Victorian Lodging House that will be a revelation for many readers. There is a small photo plate section in illustration and this is a book that could be thought of as essential reading for everyone who is intrigued by the phenomena of Victorian society and the growth of a unique world Empire.

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