The Royal Navy in Eastern Waters, Linchpin of Victory 1935-1942

This is an important book that does justice to parts of WWII that have been largely forgotten. The Royal Navy in Eastern Waters played a critical role in the steps to eventual victory over the Axis countries. – Very Highly Recommended.


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NAME: The Royal Navy in Eastern Waters, Linchpin of Victory 
1935-1942
FILE: R2527
AUTHOR: Andrew Boyd
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  538
PRICE: £30.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, 1935-1942, 
Indian Ocean, Indo-China, Burma, Malaya, Australia, Japan, war at sea

ISBN: 978-1-4738-9248-4

IMAGE: B2527.jpg6
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/m3anasv
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This is an important book that does justice to parts of 
WWII that have been largely forgotten. The Royal Navy in Eastern 
Waters played a critical role in the steps to eventual victory over 
the Axis countries. – Very Highly Recommended.

The Royal Navy has failed to receive the recognition it deserves for 
its role in Eastern Waters. In the period to 1942, the British focus 
was on Europe and North Africa, with Eastern operations taking a 
priority well behind the other two theatres. That was understandable 
because resources were stretched, the first stage had to be a greatly 
expanded bombing campaign in Europe and the ejection of Axis forces 
from North Africa. The latter also had implications for Eastern 
Waters because victory in North Africa would frustrate any attempts 
for Germany and Japan to link up on land and for German naval 
operations to have friendly ports in the Mediterranean and Red Sea. 
The result was that the Royal Navy was always seriously under 
resourced in Eastern Waters, but that never stopped them following 
orders to operate in those areas with obsolete equipment and 
insufficient numbers of ships and aircraft.

The RAF in the area tried hard to support naval operations with some 
of the oldest aircraft still flying. The Fleet Air Arm fared little 
better. It was hardly surprising that HMS Repulse and HMS Prince of 
Wales should be sunk by Japanese aircraft before they could make a 
positive contribution. In the Indian Ocean, U-Boats operated against 
British convoys, using covert resupply facilities in neutral ports. 
This was to prompt the use of the Calcutta Light Horse to carry out 
a commando attack on German vessels in port in Goa. Founded as much 
as a polo club as a reserve cavalry force, the ageing members of the 
CLH performed with great courage and successfully denied U-Boats 
their secret supply base. Incidents such as these have coloured the 
popular view of the conduct of war East of Suez as far too little 
and without credible plans, where only individuals, small groups and 
isolated warships performed with immense courage on what were near 
suicide missions. 

This is an unfair picture and the author has produced a well-
researched and comprehensive study of what was in fact a grand 
strategy that embraced all of the areas and made the most of the 
available resources to achieve some notable successes. This work 
is long overdue and provides a very detailed picture of the 
realities. Many readers will be surprised by the real story of what 
happened and why, leading to a new appreciation of how the Royal Navy 
rose to meet impossible challenges and won most of the battles.

There is excellent illustration and a very well executed index and 
bibliography.