The Rise of the Seleukid Empire, 323-223 BC

B2058

This is the first book in a new series, tracing the fortunes of one of the greatest superpowers of the Ancient World. If this book is typical of the series, it will be a cracking read and a very valuable addition to the knowledge of the Ancient World. The first book has modest illustration, limited to maps and charts, but the easy narration style of the text makes this an very informative work that will appeal both to those already knowledgable in the period, and those coming into it for the first time.

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NAME: The Rise of the Seleukid Empire, 323-223 BC
DATE: 021114
FILE: R2058
AUTHOR: John D Grainger
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 242
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Ancient World, Ancient Greece, Roman Republic, Roman Empire, land warfare, Asia Minor, Central Asia, Alexander the Great, social structure, social environment, laws, commerce
ISBN: 1-78303-053-4
IMAGE: B2058.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/mejcl3b
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is the first book in a new series, tracing the fortunes of one of the greatest superpowers of the Ancient World. If this book is typical of the series, it will be a cracking read and a very valuable addition to the knowledge of the Ancient World. The first book has modest illustration, limited to maps and charts, but the easy narration style of the text makes this an very informative work that will appeal both to those already knowledgable in the period, and those coming into it for the first time.

Outside of a relatively small number of people, knowledge of the Ancient World is limited to a few extracts. Most will know of Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, some of the Roman Emperors, particularly the least successful but most colourful, Rameses II, Athens, Sparta, but not necessarily know their stories well. One of the strange gaps is the story of the Seleukid Empire and this book begins to set the record straight.

One reason why this Empire should be better understood is that it stands between Alexander the Great and the growth of Roman. When Alexander died at an early age, he had already established an immense empire that was centred in Greece, but lacked the establishment of a a central administration that would be able to sustain it for a period of time, simply because Alexander enjoyed a meteoric rise and did not have the time to establish the administrative systems required by such a considerable empire. When he died, there was a period of conflict between his generals and others as they sought to follow on as his true successor.

Seleukos I was to emerge as the head of a new empire that introduced a golden age, where it was unusually friendly to its people and steadily developed wealth. He was followed by a number of able kings, although the Empire faltered twice before eventually being dismembered by dynastic rivalry.

During its development, the Empire expanded with the building of cities in Asia Minor to Central Asia and its influence in the Middle East was to extend for centuries after its collapse.

This first book in the series follows the twists and turns as Seleukos I rose from the rank of officer in an elite guard unit to leader of a new and vibrant empire. It reads with the pull of a novel and shows how the new Empire rose and fell. Having read this absorbing account, it is difficult to see why the story of the Seleukid Empire has not previously achieved wider fame and recognition.

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