The RAF’s Air War in Libya, New Conflicts in the Era of Austerity

B1793

The author has examined and considered all of the implications and of the conduct of the air war. The text is supported by an interesting black and white photo plate section, his is a book that should be widely read

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NAME: The RAF’s Air War in Libya, New Conflicts in the Era of Austerity
CLASSIFICATION: Book Reviews
FILE: R1793
DATE: 18122
AUTHOR: Dave Sloggett
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 196
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Libya, air war, NATO, civil war, Gaddafi, RAF, FAA
ISBN: 1-78159-060-5
IMAGE: B1793.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/brgoosy
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This book is the first to analyse the Libyan Campaign, the causes of the uprising against the Gaddafi Regime and the implications for NATO.
The Uprising against the brutal Gaddafi Regime was sudden and took the world by surprise. It was also a difficult situation for Britain because the Blair Brown Regime had been closely implicated with supporting Gaddafi and bringing Libya into the international community. In a series of deals, the Blair Brown Regime had also directly participated in the rendition of Gaddafi’s opponents in exile for torture and killing by Gaddafi’s thugs. This may explain why the new Coalition Government in Britain was so keen to become involved on the side of the rebels at a time when the Coalition was busy dismantling the British Armed Forces and was desperately short of military equipment and manpower.
British Prime Minister was quick to involve NATO and act as the air force for the rebel army. Without that airpower it is highly likely that Gaddafi would have been able to extinguish the uprising and embark on a program of killings that would have eliminated the possibility of any future uprising during the next two decades.
For NATO it marked a change in the position of what had previously been a self-defence force intended to counter the threat posed during five decades by the Soviet Union. The Libyan civil war posed no direct threat to NATO or any of its members and, as the Islamisation of Libya post-war has demonstrated, NATO interests would probably have been better served by watching Gaddafi extinguish his opponents.
The author has examined and considered all of the implications and of the conduct of the air war. The text is supported by an interesting black and white photo plate section, his is a book that should be widely read.

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