The Norway Campaign and the Rise of Churchill 1940

NorwayCampaign

 The author was partly motivated to write this history because his father 
took part in the fighting, which is as good a reason as any. The result of his labours is 
well worth reading and includes some interesting images and informative maps. For some 
reason, Norway has received remarkably little coverage in the mountain of books examining
WWII from every conceivable angle. This is strange because the German invasion  of 
Norway had significant direct and indirect impacts on the outcome of WWII.
The author has examined the Norwegian campaign and the rise of Churchill, providing 
insight and balance. The text is readable and ably supported by illustrations, including 
well-chosen photo plates. The book will satisfy both those interested in WWII as a military 
conflict, but also provides social and political coverage that will appeal to a much wider 
readership. A very worthwhile and commended book.
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NAME: The Norway Campaign and the Rise of Churchill 1940
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 290414
FILE: R1966
AUTHOR: Anthony Dix
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  212
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Quizling, Norway, Germany, Britain, Chamberlain, Churchill, Scandinavia, 
German invasion, carrier aircraft, HMS Courageous, ion ore, Narvik, ice-free ports
ISBN: 1-78340-060-9
IMAGE: B1966.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/qyetqsm
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The author was partly motivated to write this history because his father 
took part in the fighting, which is as good a reason as any. The result of his labours is 
well worth reading and includes some interesting images and informative maps. For some 
reason, Norway has received remarkably little coverage in the mountain of books examining
WWII from every conceivable angle. This is strange because the German invasion  of 
Norway had significant direct and indirect impacts on the outcome of WWII.

In military terms, the German occupation of Norway, with its many deep water fjords and 
ports, provided excellent cover for German naval vessels of all sizes and allowed units to be 
sailed out of the Baltic through the narrow waters where movements could be observed and 
time given for the Royal Navy to prepare to track and destroy any vessels attempting to break 
out into the Atlantic. Norway allowed German warships to sail up the coast in easy stages 
and hide from British reconnaissance aircraft and ships, waiting for the moment to break out 
and with the options of simultaneous breakouts of warships distributed along the extensive 
Norwegian coast. Once Germany invaded Russia, Norway also provided a multitude of bases 
for U-Boats, aircraft and surface ships that would be able to maintain a high rate of attack on 
Allied convoys attempting to supply Russia through the port of Murmansk on the hazardous 
Arctic Convoys that fought both atrocious weather and sea conditions and almost continuous
German attack for almost all of the convoy routes.

The Germans also hoped to use Norway to launch air attacks on what they considered the 
undefended North of England and of Scotland, while the RAF was being destroyed along 
the English Channel coast. They discovered the hard way that the RAF was there to meet 
and destroy their bombers, discouraging any further serious bombing raids from Norway. 
The Norwegians were to prove themselves much more resistant than the Germans had expected, 
with Quisling unable to deliver the majority control over his fellow Norwegians. The 
Norwegian Royal Family escaped to Britain to form a Government in exile and a regular 
flow of fishing boats assisted and maintained Norwegian resistance fighters who, with 
British commando support were to disrupt the German heavy water production and deny 
Germany a viable nuclear weapon. All of those military factors more than justify a much 
greater coverage of the Norwegian campaign and the German occupation, but the greatest 
impact was to be on British politics and war direction.

Chamberlain was a decent man who proved a disastrous British Prime Minister. His policy 
of appeasement of Hitler was a major contributory factory that produced war. Initially, 
Hitler, as recently with the Russian Fascist Putin, was reliant on bluff. Had France and 
Britain stood up to the Germans at an early stage, Hitler would have been rejected by 
German voters and war avoided. For many reasons, some of which were not entirely bad, 
appeasement allowed Hitler to expand a Greater Germany and then start to threaten 
non-German neighbours. Eventually, Britain and France had no option but to declare 
war when Germany invaded Poland, but the Franco-British Governments continued to 
be led by appeasers who were less than enthusiastic about active military attacks on 
Germany. Much time was wasted in leaflet dropping when heavy bombing would have 
been more productive. Soldiers sat in the French defence lines, assuming that this would 
deter the Germans. When Hitler launched his forces through Belgium into France and 
attacked Holland and Denmark, with a full invasion of Norway, the British lost patience 
with Chamberlain and he was replaced by Churchill. Without the German occupation of 
Norway, Churchill might never have become the outstanding wartime leader that Britain 
needed.

The author has examined the Norwegian campaign and the rise of Churchill, providing 
insight and balance. The text is readable and ably supported by illustrations, including 
well-chosen photo plates. The book will satisfy both those interested in WWII as a military 
conflict, but also provides social and political coverage that will appeal to a much wider 
readership. A very worthwhile and commended book.