The Men Who Flew The F-4 Phantom

The author has established an impressive portfolio of aviation histories and established a loyal following of readers. This new book is a worthy addition to the portfolio and covers the men who flew one of the most important combat aircraft of the Cold War – most highly recommended.


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NAME: The Men Who Flew The F-4 Phantom
FILE: R2638
AUTHOR: Martin W Bowman
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  272
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Cold War, super-sonic jets, air superiority, ground 
attack, dog fighting, guns, missiles, low level high speed flight, 
interceptor, missile carrier

ISBN: 1-52670-584-2

IMAGE: B2638.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ybl2ld8r
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The author has established an impressive portfolio of 
aviation histories and established a loyal following of readers. 
This new book is a worthy addition to the portfolio and covers the 
men who flew one of the most important combat aircraft of the Cold 
War  – most highly recommended.

The F-4 Phantom became one of, if not the, most important combat 
aircraft of the Cold War. However it was not without its weaknesses.

Primarily it was a radar system and missile carrier with a gun being 
added later as something of an afterthought. It was designed at a 
time when conventional thinking had decided that manned fighters 
were coming to the end of the road and were only justified as a 
platform for heavier and longer ranged guided missiles. That meant 
that aircraft in this category would need a two man crew, one to 
pilot and a weapons officer who would do much of the work. There 
was also a demand for ever greater range as the point defence 
interceptor was already being replaced by missile batteries. That, 
together with a desire for heavier missiles, meant the fighter was 
inevitably a much larger and heavier aircraft, totally unsuitable 
for dog fighting. The Americans found out the hard way that Vietnam 
required dog fighting capability which also meant a major rethink of 
how fighter pilots should be trained. It resulted in 'aggressor' 
squadrons and the famous USN 'Top Gun' school. There was not much 
that could be done with smoky engines and the size of the F-4 Phantom, 
but training could equip pilots to dog fight with the small MiG-21 
and similar opposing aircraft.

The F-4 in its various versions served the USAF and USN very well 
and it also served with friendly powers including Israel and Great 
Britain. The author has included two very well-selected photo plate 
sections to illustrate his descriptive text.

The F-4 Phantom has inspired many good books, but this new book is 
in a class of its own. It deals with the part aircrew played in the 
story and provides a detailed but very readable account of the 
Phantom story. It will appeal to a very wide readership because it 
addresses the professionals, enthusiasts and modellers, but also 
provides an outstanding book for general readers and those starting 
to develop an interest in aviation history.