The Men Behind Monty

B2280

The author has come from a background of banking and finance, writing as an enthusiast. The result is a most readable book that shows its foundation on thorough research. Monty is one of that handful of successful commanders who has become myth and legend. As is common for great commanders, the many men on whose efforts the success was built remain largely unknown. This book redresses the balance by considering how each of these men made Monty’s successes possible and also shows how the General’s important talent lay in motivating those below him and then having the wisdom to provide support but to avoid interfering. A great book and a rewarding read.

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NAME: The Men Behind Monty
FILE: R2280
AUTHOR:  Richard Mead
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  290
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War Two, WWII, Second World War, Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, 
Bernard Montgomery, Monty,  8th Army, Desert Rats, armoured warfare, desert, 
North Africa, Italy, Normandy, Luneburg
ISBN: 1-47382-716-7
IMAGE: B2280.jpg
BUYNOW: 
LINKS: http://tinyurl.com/jzh6lrh
DESCRIPTION: The author has come from a background of banking and finance, 
writing as an enthusiast. The result is a most readable book that shows 
its foundation on thorough research. Monty is one of that handful of 
successful commanders who has become myth and legend. As is common for 
great commanders, the many men on whose efforts the success was built 
remain largely unknown. This book redresses the balance by considering 
how each of these men made Monty's successes possible and also shows 
how the General's important talent lay in motivating those below him 
and then having the wisdom to provide support but to avoid interfering. 
A great book and a rewarding read.

Field Marshal Viscount Montgomery had started his career with a reputation 
for cautious preparation and maintained that impression through his career. 
He had a talent for inspiring loyalty amongst his subordinates and that 
is evidenced by the fact that many of those he inherited when he took 
command in Egypt remained with him until the end of the war. Some US 
generals were unkind in considering him over-cautious but the US 
entered the war late, had suffered no measurable attacks on their home 
land, made great profit from the war and fielded armies that were 
learning in battle, having previously enjoyed only theoretical knowledge
 of war. Perhaps more importantly they had not experienced poor supplies. 
Montgomery however was, like all British army commanders, accustomed to 
supply difficulties, shortages of men and essential equipment, and 
Churchill's habit of changing priorities for what he saw as vital
 political consideration, but which could mean an advancing commander 
suddenly found himself denuded of supplies and reinforcements that had 
been diverted somewhere else.

Against this background, Montgomery took over the land forces in Egypt 
after a number of cycles of advance and retreat where gallant and 
well-commanded advances were inevitably followed by a lack of supplies 
that forced a retreat. Accordingly, Monty visited all of his troops, 
inspired them and made sure that supplies and equipment were collected 
not just for the next attack but to reinforce and supply the subsequent 
advance. He was also lucky that American equipment had started to 
arrive in some numbers and he was able to provide his attacking force 
with the best available armour and other weapons that were much closer 
to the technical capability of the German armour and anti-armour.

His cautious planning also introduced a major change in approach. 
Rommel had previously profited by a British failure to identify his 
habit for flank attacks from the South. Monty quickly saw this German 
habit and when Rommel next tried it. Monty had adequate numbers of 
troops in position to frustrate the German strategy. He punctured 
Rommel's legend of invincibility and then began to develop his own.

Prior to the war-changing assault at El Alamein, Monty built a team 
of subordinates who were gifted in their fields and highly supportive 
of his style of command. Many of that initial team were still loyally 
behind him when the German Army surrendered on Luneburg Heath in 1945.

The author demonstrates his dedication to thorough research and 
provides a series of new insights into Monty and his Staff. It is a 
nicely paced account and includes some good images in the photo plate 
section.

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