The Japanese Navy in World War II, in the words of former Japanese Naval Officers, Second Edition

The second edition of a definitive work first published in 1986 and lauded by historians. The collection of essays and thoughts of Japanese Naval officers provides many fresh insights from a Japanese perspective. – Very Highly Recommended.


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NAME: The Japanese Navy in World War II, in the words of former 
Japanese Naval Officers, Second Edition
FILE: R2628
AUTHOR: editor David C Evans
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Naval Institute Press
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  568
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, 
Japanese Navy, US Navy, US expansion in Pacific, British Empire, 
European colonial interests, raw materials, military balance, naval 
warfare

ISBN: 1-52671-303-9

IMAGE: B2628.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y8p2edsl
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The second edition of a definitive work first published 
in 1986 and lauded by historians. The collection of essays and 
thoughts of Japanese Naval officers provides many fresh insights 
from a Japanese perspective.  – Very Highly Recommended.

There has been a shortage of  European books on the war in the 
Pacific. There has been an even greater shortage of books with a 
Japanese perspective. This is understandable, because Britain and 
the other European colonial powers were heavily focussed on the war 
in Europe which had first call on resources and priorities, also 
being immediately visible with bombing campaigns. The Japanese lost 
heavily and it is equally natural that many wanted to forget the 
war and their part in it. This also explains why this book did not 
appear until 1986 with Japan becoming an important ally against 
potential Russian and Chinese expansion.

The scope of the essays assembled to form this book is comprehensive 
and reflects the changing fortunes for Japan during WWII. The rapid 
expansion in the opening actions made Japan look and feel immortal 
and invincible. Then came the realities as the Allies slowed, 
stopped and then began reversing the Japanese advances. For the 
first time it is possible to glimpse the changing Japanese 
confidence and expectations within the Japanese Navy.

An absorbing read with excellent editing of the original work 
grouped together for the first time.