The Hunters and the Hunted, The Elimination of German Surface Warships Around the World 1914-1915

B1790

The story of the hunt for German raiders is a thrilling tale, told well. The book also has a black and white plate section to support the text, including an artists impression of the raider Wolf employing her scout plane during the attack on a Japanese merchant vessel Hitachi Maru.

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NAME: The Hunters and the Hunted, The Elimination of German Surface Warships Around the World 1914-1915
CLASSIFICATION: Book Reviews
FILE: R1790
DATE: 18122
AUTHOR: Brian Perrett
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 150
PRICE: £18.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Commerce raiders, German Navy, Royal Navy, Emden, Goeben, Breslau, Scharnhorst, Gneisenau,Konigsberg, HMAS Sydney, Karlsruhe,
HMS Monmouth, HMS Good Hope, Lake Tanganyika, gunboats, aircraft spotters, armed motor boats
ISBN: 1-84884-638-X
IMAGE: B1790.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/brjgfnk
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Before the outbreak of WWI, the German Navy had begun moving its commerce raiders out to their war patrols. These ships ranged from converted merchant ships with hidden guns to modern warships. The Royal Navy had to track down all of these vessels and eliminate them.
It took the first year of war for the Royal Navy to clear the seas of German commerce raiders and secure the trade routes to the Empire. The author has covered the major actions, including the escape of Goeben and Breslau to Turkey, where they were incorporated into the Turkish Navy, operating in the Aegean and Black Seas.
This was not a one sided action and the Royal Navy suffered frustration and some reverses. The gathering of the Grand Fleet at Scapa Flow was necessary to counter the German High Seas Fleet, which remained mainly bottled up in its home ports. That meant that older and less capable warships were tasked with protecting the merchant traffic in the South Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean.
The search for German ships was little different from the days of Nelson. Maritime patrol aircraft had yet to be developed, the Germans made careful use of wireless communications and the commerce raiders operated largely on their own, hiding in the vast oceans and making hit and run raids on merchant vessels that followed reasonably predictable routes. Even the German East Asian Squadron of two armoured cruisers, with several light cruisers, operated independently with some success until they were brought to battle off the Falkland Islands where they were sunk.
In East Africa, German troops fought a roving battle with British troops and made use of the guns from the Konigsberg which had been hiding in the Rufiji River where British spotter aircraft and monitors were used to destroy her by indirect fire. The Germans also operated three armed ships on Lake Tanganyika dominating the Lake. The British shipped two armed motor boats from England to West Africa. They were landed and made a 400 mile journey by river and overland transport, to clear Lake Tanganyika of German armed patrol boats and allow a British invasion of Tanganyika. This operation inspired the book and film “African Queen”
The story of the hunt for German raiders is a thrilling tale, told well. The book also has a black and white plate section to support the text, including an artists impression of the raider Wolf employing her scout plane during the attack on a Japanese merchant vessel Hitachi Maru.

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