The History Of Hickam Field And The Attacks Of 7 December 1941, “They’re Killing My Boys!”

Three leading US military historians collaborate to produce a fresh review of the wider actions on the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbour. This is an original review of the attack with fresh insight and many rare photographs. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: The History Of Hickam Field And The Attacks Of 7 December 1941, 
“They're Killing My Boys!”
FILE: R3048
AUTHOR: J Michael Wenger, Robert J Cressman, John F Di Virgilio
PUBLISHER: US Naval Institute Press
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: US$42.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, 
Pearl Harbour, Japanese air attack, Hawaii, Hickam Field, USAAF, USN, bombers, 
fighters, long range patrol aircraft, carrier aircraft, 1941, US Pacific Fleet

ISBN: 978-1-68247-458-7

IMAGE: B3048.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/v8lxcom
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: Three leading US military historians collaborate to produce a fresh 
review of the wider actions on the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbour. This is 
an original review of the attack with fresh insight and many rare photographs. – 
Most Highly Recommended.

The Japanese attack on the US Pacific Fleet at anchor in Pearl Harbour was inspired 
by the British attack on the Italian Fleet in port, that was in turn based on plans drawn 
up by the Royal Naval Air Service in 1917 for a carrier task force attack on the 
German High Seas Fleet in port which was ignored by the RAF when it took over all 
British military aviation in 1918. Motivation was different. 

In 1917, the RNAS had reached its peak with several aircraft carriers available, 
together with shipboard aircraft, and long range land-based bombers. At the time, the 
German fleet was tying up resources, but refusing to leave port to do battle. The 
RNAS wanted to remove the potential threat it posed, with the threat of the Russian 
Revolution freeing up German troops committed to the Eastern Front, and Royal Navy 
intervention forces that were being prepared to land in Russia to support the White 
Russians.

In WWII, the RN Mediterranean Fleet based in Alexandria faced a potentially 
powerful modern Italian Fleet that threatened to cut the Mediterranean and destroy the 
British ships based in Egypt. Sending a carrier with its Swordfish biplane torpedo 
bombers on a surprise assault of the Italians in their home port was a bold and risky 
move but it was all the resource available to the British at that time. The attack was 
highly successful and gave the British months of naval supremacy in the 
Mediterranean at a critical time, allowing reinforcement of Malta and expansion of its 
air and naval force to cut convoys from Italy to North Africa. It also enabled the 
British to run convoys from Egypt to Tobruk.

In 1941, the Japanese had already been at war with China since 1938 and had been 
goaded by the US policy to reduce supplies of essential raw materials to Japan. At the 
same time, the Japanese saw France and the Netherlands removed from the war in 
Europe and Britain fully occupied by the Germans, presenting an opportunity to 
invade Indo-China, taking British, French and Dutch colonies with their rich natural 
resources. However, Japan could not be sure that the US would not come to the 
assistance of the British and would continue to pose a threat to Japanese interests. To 
neutralize the US threat, the Japanese needed to take out the US Pacific Fleet, expand 
rapidly across Indo China and India, together with the Western Pacific and Australia. 
In a lightening war, the Japanese hoped to end up with a strong negotiating position, 
forcing the US to agree to a peace treaty, as a major strategic plan.

The shock of burning, sinking battleships and the humiliation of the US has naturally
 resulted in the focus of historians on the attacks on the US Pacific Fleet and the lucky 
escape of its carriers that the Japanese expected to be at anchor when their naval 
aviators struck. The Japanese attacked Hickam Field and civilian targets on the island. 
Although the destruction of the ships was a critical task for the Japanese, it was also 
essential that their aircraft destroy the naval yard and Hickam Field. This would delay 
US attempts to send new ships to Pearl Harbour and new aircraft, but it also had the 
second vital requirement of preventing the heavy bombers at Hickam Field being sent 
out against the Japanese strike force and the fighters there attacking the Japanese 
bombers.

This new book looks in detail at the part of the Battle of Pearl Harbour that has 
previously been ignored or glossed over by historians since 1941.