DVD Review – The Hawker Hurricane

KB0164

 

The Spitfire may have won the glory, but the Hurricane initially outperformed German 109 fighters and achieved a much higher kill rate in the Battle of Britain, but it was a partnership with the Spitfire where the differing capabilities of the two fighters complimented each other.

This is one of those videos that must be watched.

 

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NAME: The Hawker Hurricane
CLASSIFICATION: Video, DVD, reviews
FILE: K0164
DATE: 020714
PRESENTER(S): original film
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword Digital
MEDIA: DVD
FORMAT: Dual layer
RUNTIME: 100 minutes
PLAYERS: Linux Workstation, Personal Computer, Mac Computer, DVD Player
INTERNET:
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non-Fiction
SUBJECT: World War Two, WWII, Second World War, war in the air, aerial combat, tchnology, RAF, Hurricane, Hawker
ISBN: 0-24762-096-3
IMAGE: KB0164
VIDEO:
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/obzvncj
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Pen & Sword are a prolific publisher of fine military history books and are now rapidly expand their range of electronic publications in the form of ebooks and DVDs. Their DVD range includes video produced mainly or entirely from wartime film and propaganda film from a number of production sources. These sources are arranged into groups and this DVD is from the World War II Primary Sources, meaning that it has not been updated or edited by a modern production company. As a result, some footage looks its age when included in a modern digital video compilation. The footage exception being film of one of the last flying urricanes. The viewer is unlikely to be put off in any way because, where a small amount of footage shows signs of its age, the methods of processing, and the storage for more than seven decades, it adds to the atmosphere and authenticity of the DVD.

This is genuinely the ultimate primary source guide to the aircraft that helped save Britain in 1940 and flew on through the war and into the times that followed victory.

The Hurricane was designed to reduce the risks of migrating from biplanes to monoplanes. The first Hurricanes had a fixed pitch two-bladed propeller just like the contemporary Hawker Fury biplane fighter. The cockpit was enclosed by a sliding plexiglass hood where the Fury was still open cockpit. In place of twin machine guns firing through the propeller arc, the Hurricane had four rifle calibre machine guns in each wing, firing outside the propeller. This gave approximately eight times the weight of shell hitting the target over the Fury’s weight of shell. Accuracy was provided by a reflector gun sight. HF radiotelephone communication was fitted to the Hurricane, providing the communication to take full advantage of the new radar assisted command and control network covering Britain.

The most obvious difference from the Fury was that the Hurricane had a low mounted broad cord monoplane wing in place of the Fury’s wire and strut based biplanes. After take off, the retractable undercarriage of the Hurricane was another difference that was obvious. In common with the Fury, the early Hurricanes were almost entirely fabric covered with a tube and former construction method almost identical with the Fury.

Although the Hurricane and Fury had similar contours, the Hurricane was fitted with the Merlin engine that was to power other outstanding British aircraft, including the Spitfire, Mosquito and Lancaster. This and the reduced drag of the monoplane gave the early Hurricane a staggering hundred miles per hour speed advantage over the Fury but still retained great manoeuvrability.

After introduction, ahead of the Spitfire, the Hurricane was fitted with later Merlin marks and a three bladed variable-pitch propeller. Four 20mm canon replaced the machine guns and some Hurricanes were fitted with 30 mm anti-tank guns, or a mixed canon and machine gun armament. The fabric covering was progressively replaced by metal skinning but still on a tube and former frame, that continued to allow the aircraft to survive heavy punishment that destroyed other monoplanes of the time.

After 1940, the Hurricane was increasingly assigned to the ground attack roll and was able to carry bombs or rockets. Some exhausted RAF Hurricanes were transferred to the Fleet Air Arm for semi-suicide convoy defence being catapulted from merchant ships with no chance of making land or being able to land on a ship.

The Spitfire may have won the glory, but the Hurricane initially outperformed German 109 fighters and achieved a much higher kill rate in the Battle of Britain, but it was a partnership with the Spitfire where the differing capabilities of the two fighters complimented each other.

This is one of those videos that must be watched.

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