The Great War in the Argonne Forest, French & American Battles, 1914-1918

This is a vivid account of the enduring Battle(s) of the Argonne Forest. The largely static nature of warfare on the Western Front saw a series of battles for the same stretches of ground over the duration of the Great War, culminating in the deployment of US troops in 1918, their largest battle for Argonne Very Highly Recommended

NAME:  The Great War in the Argonne Forest, French & American Battles, 1914-1918
FILE: R3379
AUTHOR: Richard Merry
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                              
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   The Great War, First World War, WWI, World War I, World War 1, 
Argonne Forest, French Army, US Expeditionary Force, German Army

ISBN: 1-52677-326-0

PAGES: 250,  8 page photo-plate section with images in B&W with B&W maps 
through the body of the book
IMAGE: B3379.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/mvb57rnr
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DESCRIPTION: This is a vivid account of the enduring Battle(s) of the Argonne 
Forest. The largely static nature of warfare on the Western Front saw a series of 
battles for the same stretches of ground over the duration of the Great War, 
culminating in the deployment of US troops in 1918, their largest battle for 
Argonne  Very Highly Recommended

The author provided a a vivid account of the battle for the Argonne Forest. As with all the other hot spots along the Front, a series of battles were fought over the same ground from 1914 to the end of the Great War in 1918. Initially, French and Italian troops fought the Germans for this ground. It was perhaps more a four year campaign than a series of battles and one of the aspects of WWI that most often confuses those developing an interest in the Great War is that some battles are commonly referred to in the year in which they were fought, but some are known as the First, Second, etc. Contact was however continuous from the start of the bitter trench warfare and the main variation was the intensity of contact at a specific time.

Until the arrival of the tank, commanders had no real option but to pound enemy trenches and, even then, the tank was not very reliable mechanically, conditions for the crews was dreadful, and the tank was still vulnerable to artillery. That meant that concentrations of troops and artillery were made at points along the trench line for the next ‘Big Push’ and when these had gone through the mincer the survivors licked their wounds in a ‘quiet’ period before the next ‘Big Push’. During the quiet periods there was still contact with a regular exchange of fire so that, in a sense, a battle at a particular point on the line continued from 1914 to 1918.

The epic battle for the Argonne Forest saw a large US force join the line in the Autumn of 1918. The author has told the story with the memoirs of US soldiers. He has also continued the story into the outbreak of the Spanish Flu that was to cost so many lives around the world in the first modern pandemic. As one form of death was to give way to another, the soldiers had to bury their dead and the villages were to be rebuilt and the reforestation of Argonne carried out, only for it to see further fighting in 1940, this time with a war of rapid mechanized movement.