The Great War Illustrated 1915

B2312

Text has been used very sparingly and is largely restricted to captions and extended captions. The book stands, and stands well, on the incredible selection of images that include full colour images. This is a visual treat and much recommended.

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NAME: The Great War Illustrated 1915
FILE: R2312
AUTHOR: William Langford, Jack Holroyd
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 368
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War One, First World War, WWI, The Great War, 1915, 1914-1918, Gallipoli, Western Front, 2nd Ypres, air war, land forces, trenches, war at sea
ISBN: 1-47382-396-X
IMAGE: B2312.jpg
BUYNOW:
LINKS: http://tinyurl.com/jbxxvyv
DESCRIPTION: Text has been used very sparingly and is largely restricted to captions and extended captions. The book stands, and stands well, on the incredible selection of images that include full colour images. This is a visual treat and much recommended.

There is not much that a reviewer can say, beyond commending authors and publisher for bringing this strong collection of images to the reader. A year in the Great War covers the battles on land, sea, and in the air. The quality of the photographs reproduced ranges from good to outstanding and provides an indication of the scale of the photographic record.

WWI saw the benefits of the revolution in photography. As in this fine collection of images, there were some areas that still required the services of illustrator/artist but, in the main, the camera was able to cover all events. The use of glass plate negatives continued and that inevitably meant that some images were recorded on large and bulky cameras that had to be carefully positioned and were difficult to use where sudden movement was present. The roll film camera was becoming available in some numbers and with many very small cameras that could be carried in the pocket. There had been a similar revolution in the manufacture of lenses and this made aerial photography practical against a range of subjects. There was then the excitement of full colour film and, although most images continued to be monochrome, the availability of colour film was increasing and offering impressive and durable images. Then there was the combination of artist and monochrome prints that were coloured by hand. Moving film was used, both to provide animated records, and as the basis of selective stills, copied, or cut from movie film.

Graphically this was a very exciting time. The speed of photographic development was impressive, even though some special film types were not widely available, and some failed to produce durable prints. The authors have made an impressive selection that not only provides an effective record of 1915, but a representation of the advances in film technology.

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