The First Contest for North America, 1689-1697, King William’s War

The reign of King William and Queen Mary has been strangely neglected when it was the pivotal point in the development of the British Empire and the dominance at sea of the Royal Navy. This new book corrects the omission with a stylish review of what could be described as the first global war. – Very Highly Recommended

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NAME: The First Contest for North America, 1689-1697, King William's War
FILE: R2863
AUTHOR: Michael G Laramie
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Westhome
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 322
PRICE: US$35.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: William III, William of Orange, Mary Stuart, colonial expansion, naval 
warfare, Seventeenth Century, Protestant, Catholic Wars, Indian, Dutch, French, 
English conflicts

ISBN: 978-1-59416-288-6

IMAGE: B2863.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y6mezrvjj
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The reign of King William and Queen Mary has been strangely 
neglected when it was the pivotal point in the development of the British Empire and 
the dominance at sea of the Royal Navy. This new book corrects the omission with 
a stylish review of what could be described as the first global war. –   Very Highly 
Recommended

The two daughters of the much hated Roman Catholic King James II were raised as 
Protestants and secured the Protestant succession. First, Mary Stuart, married to the 
Dutch William of Orange, was invited by Parliament to replace her father who fled 
into exile. The reign of William and Mary covered battles on land and at sea to fight 
off the attempts of James and the Jacobites to regain the British throne. It was a global 
conflict and it marked the serious development of the British Empire, made possible 
by the rise of the Royal Navy and its dominance of the war at sea. The major focus 
on land was in Ireland and Scotland where the Jacobites attempted to defeat William 
to seize the throne back, but the most important battlefields became those in America 
and at sea in supporting British forces in America.

William was a warrior King who is remembered still in Ireland for his defeat of the 
Catholics. While Catholics and Protestants in Ireland still hold strong feelings against 
and for William, were he has been the focal point of conflict between the two 
communities, he has strangely been neglected in the rest of Britain. The later Seven 
Years War has been better remembered but it is the Napoleonic Wars that have 
received the most attention of historians.

The author reviews the sequence of events as William waged war. Without the 
successes of his forces, the Seven Years War would not have seen the Royal Navy 
stamp its authority on the oceans. Without the Seven Years War establishing British 
naval supremacy, the Battle of Trafalgar would not have been able to confirm that 
supremacy and herald a hundred years of peace, where there was no navy to stand 
against the Royal Navy. Without that sequence, the British Empire would have been 
unable to develop because its sea routes would have been vulnerable. In setting that 
sequence out, the importance of King William's War is indisputable. It is a 
remarkable story.