The End of Glory, War & Peace in HMS Hood 1916-1941

B1732

The author has produced a completely new approach, combining detailed research and thrilling narrative through the history of the Hood to her eventual sinking. This includes contributions from 150 former crewmen.

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NAME: The End of Glory, War & Peace in HMS Hood 1916-1941
CLASSIFICATION: Book Reviews
FILE: R1732
DATE: 260512
AUTHOR: John Carr
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 246
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, The Great War, WWII, World War Two, 1939-1945, Second World War, naval architecture, battlecruisers, RN Flagship, hunting the Bismark
ISBN: 1-84832-139-7
IMAGE: B1732.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/84jt2pv
LINKS: http://tinyurl.com/
DESCRIPTION: Much has been written about the Hood and there has been good film and television coverage of parts of her story. Most accounts had concentrated heavily on the unequal fight with the Bismark. The author has produced a completely new approach, combining detailed research and thrilling narrative through the history of the Hood to her eventual sinking. This includes contributions from 150 former crewmen. HMS Hood was part of the largely unsuccessful British experiments with the battlecruiser. The concept was intended to produce a fast and nibble vessel that carried the heavy guns of a fleet battleship. To achieve this, reduced armour was necessary to reduce weight. The result was a vessel that was not necessarily faster than the heavy battleship, but was vulnerable to plunging fire and aerial bombardment. The Hood was an unusually large battlecruiser and unusually wet. Living conditions aboard could be uncomfortable and contributed to the Invergordon mutiny. As a naval vessel, Hood might not have had a long life because of her weaknesses, but she looked the part and became a much loved symbol. Unfortunately, her weaknesses were fatally exposed when she met the Bismark in combat. Her sinking was a serious blow to morale because her symbolic nature had captured public attention and she was considered more powerful than she really was. The author has presented a story that grasps the reader and provides a rewarding picture of the life and times of this tragic warship. A black and white plate section adds good illustrative support from building to sinking. Hood was perhaps an appropriate symbol during the closing years of British Empire, appearing more than she really was but fitting well with the ceremonial of Empire.

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