The Duke of York’s Flanders Campaign, Fighting The French Revolution 1793-1795

The Duke of York got bad press at the time and, from historians, subsequently because he led an Allied force against the French and was driven back. The author has provided fresh insight into a disastrous campaign through fresh study. – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: The Duke of York's Flanders Campaign, Fighting The French Revolution 1793-1795
FILE: R3148
AUTHOR: Steve Brown
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:  French Revolutionary War, French Revolution, Low Countries, Allied 
Army, French Army, Duke of York, Anglo-Hanoverian soldiers, Dutch troops, 
Hessian troops, Prussian troops, Imperial Austrian troops, George III

ISBN: 1-52674-269-1
PAGES: 380
IMAGE: B3148.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/vt8cgyd
DESCRIPTION: The Duke of York got bad press at the time and, from historians, 
subsequently because he led an Allied force against the French and was driven back. 
The author has provided fresh insight into a disastrous campaign through fresh 
study. – Very Highly Recommended.

When the French Revolution broke out it was a serious shock to the monarchies of 
Europe. As the revolutionaries looked to expand their borders, and foment revolution 
in neighbouring countries, an alliance was formed against them and the Duke of York 
was sent to the Low Countries in command of the Anglo-Hanoverian force that was 
to be part of the ring of armies from the monarchies of Europe who were seeking to 
contain and overturn the French Revolution. The Duke of York was to be forced to 
march up and down, into a terrible and humiliating retreat. In the process, the 
commander got the blame, much of which was unfair to the Duke.

The author has taken a fresh and much-needed look at what happened, providing fresh 
insights.

The British have never been keen on standing armies and instead depended heavily 
on the Royal Navy to prevent the invasion of the British Isles, the defence of the long 
sea routes on which so much depended economically, and to take the fight to the 
enemy navies and their maritime trade. Generally, from the Tudors, Britain has paid 
German and Dutch troops to fight for them on land in Europe. British soldiers who 
participated in the succession of land wars were mercenaries augmenting the 
Swedish, Dutch and German forces. Some Scottish families maintained regiments in 
Germany on this basis. As, on this occasion, it was necessary to fight directly as a 
formal part of the Coalition, The Duke of York, son of George III, was sent with 
British troops drawn from the small army raised to serve British interests around the 
globe.

The Duke of York found, as did many a British commander at the start of a new 
conflict forced by the ambitions of other States, that this force was not well-trained or 
equipped and the new war was a steep learning curve. He did not fair as badly as the 
BEF in 1940, but he was forced into retreat and the British reputation suffered. 
However, he did learn from the experiences, as did his troops, and efforts were made 
to avoid a future failure of arms. When the same soldiers went to Portugal under 
Wellington, they benefited from the experiences and the efforts to improve their 
capabilities to the point where they fought through Spain and Portugal against 
numerically superior French armies and drove them back and into France to end the 
Napoleonic Wars, until Napoleon escaped from exile in Elba and a final battle was 
fought at Waterloo.

This makes the Flanders campaign very interesting, not for martial success, but for 
redirecting British military thought.