The Devil’s Trap, The Victims Of The Cawnpore Massacre During The Indian Mutiny

A vivid account of an insurrection that shook the British Empire. The photo-plate sections add to the text with some very interesting images, many in full colour. – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: The Devil's Trap, The Victims Of  The Cawnpore Massacre During The 
Indian Mutiny
FILE: R3098
AUTHOR: James W Bancroft
PUBLISHER: frontline books, Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: India, The Raj, The Honourable East India Company, British Empire, 
Imperial expansion, Anglo-French Wars, Indian royalty, religious discord, European 
administrators, Colonial Service

ISBN: 1-52671-801-4

PAGES: 181
IMAGE: B3098.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/wztc4lq

DESCRIPTION: A vivid account of an insurrection that shook the British Empire. 
The photo-plate sections add to the text with some very interesting images, 
many in full colour. – Highly Recommended.

India, before the arrival of Europeans, was a collection of States and strongly 
conflicting religions. Britain became involved, as in so many areas of what became 
the British Empire, through its merchant adventurers, rather than by priests seeking 
to convert or nations seeking to dominate and rule. To understand the nature and 
success of British expansion it is necessary to understand how the greatest empire in 
history was able to grow with so few British, particularly British military personnel.

The East India Company received the grant of a trade monopoly. It had to build its 
own warships to escort its rich convoys between Britain and India, and it had to 
form, train and equip its own army, but in the main it relied very heavily of the many 
native factions and their troops. By diplomacy, negotiation and inducement, the East 
India Company built a network of alliances that required very few British soldiers. It 
became enormously rich and expanded East from India into the Dutch East Indies and 
China, using Indian opium to pay for goods from China. In was, like any commercial 
giant, less than moral in its dealings, seeking trade volume and profit above all. Many 
Britons, especially Scots went to India and made their fortune, building a life of 
comfort far beyond anything they might have achieved at home. Some of them 
adopted local religions and many married local women, build substantial homes, 
staffed by Indian servants.

Had it not been for the Anglo-French Wars, and the attempts by France to build its 
own empire at British experience, followed by a later appreciation in Britain of the 
excesses of the East India Company, regular British troops might never have been 
sent out. By the time of the Indian Mutiny, the stationing of British troops had 
changed the face of British involvement in India. As a result, colonial administrators 
were being sent to maintain a form of law built on British judicial structures. Key 
locations were garrisoned by British troops and Christian missionaries were going to 
India to convert Indians to their respective Christian sects. That inevitably built 
conflicts of interest, although the military force in India was still largely made up of 
Indian troops.

When the Indian Mutiny began, it shook the British Empire. Its scale and ferocity had 
never been seen elsewhere. The story of the Cawnpore Massacre gives insights into 
the conflict that broke out across India and which was in due course put down by the 
British severely.

This book demonstrates the careful research for which the author is deservedly 
renowned. He has produced an insightful consideration of the rebellion and told the 
story graphically.