The Collapse of Rome, Marius, Sulla & the 1st Civil War (91-70BC)

B1916

The author has provided a very readable insight into a period of Roman history that is very important but a mystery to most people. He has included photo plates, sketches and maps that very effectively support the text. The only feeling by the end of this book, and its very helpful end notes, is that it will then be necessary to reconsider any impressions formed before reading the book.

reviews

adn

bgn

nthn

ftd

NAME: The Collapse of Rome, Marius, Sulla & the 1st Civil War (91-70BC)
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 161213
FILE: R1916
AUTHOR: Gareth C Sampson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 284
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Rome, Roman Republic, Jugurthine, Northern wars, Sulla, civil war
ISBN: 1-84884-326-7
IMAGE: B1916.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/oo9qpv9
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Apart from a handful of people who make a detailed study of the development of Rome from a city state to a mighty empire, most of those making some study concentrate on a fairly small number of well-known accounts of the rise and fall of Rome. It is likely that many seeing a book entitled “Collapse of Rome” will assume that it covers the final years of the Empire in the 5th Century AD. If so, this book will be a revelation.

Through the period of Roman development, there was a complex interaction of important figures. No Roman general or emperor could even afford to relax and never come to trust many of even, or especially, his close circle.

By the early 1st Century BC, Rome was already a mighty state that had driven opposition before it. It had a firm hold on the Western Mediterranean and had expanded East into the Middle East and to the borders with Parthia. Perhaps from the earliest days, Rome had been a very complex society and never more true than during the 1st Century BC. As Rome expanded, it was always very difficult to find a natural boundary. Each new conquest led on to another. Lines of communications stretched, pacified lands rose up, the ambitions of generals spilled over into civil war.

The author has provided a very readable insight into a period of Roman history that is very important but a mystery to most people. He has included photo plates, sketches and maps that very effectively support the text. The only feeling by the end of this book, and its very helpful end notes, is that it will then be necessary to reconsider any impressions formed before reading the book.

Of course the major problem facing any student of history, where the basic subject extends beyond half a millennium, is that only small periods can be studied in any detail, but to really understand the era, it is necessary to develop an understanding of the whole period. Considering how many words have been used to describe the nature and events of Roman history, over so many centuries, it is an impossibility to grasp fully the whole story. Specialization then creates knowledge that is based on assertions that can be taken out of context, producing a false image. At least here is a book that provides a very clear picture and relates the period to the general story of Rome. It is also an enjoyable read.

Leave a Reply