The British Carrier Strike Fleet After 1945

The author followed a career in the Fleet Air Arm with a stint as curator at the Fleet Air Arm Museum, before becoming a successful author of naval aviation histories. This is a comprehensive study of the bitter sweet post WWII history of British naval aviation and will become a standard reference for its subject. – Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: The British Carrier Strike Fleet After 1945
FILE: R2507
AUTHOR: David Hobbs
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  622
PRICE: £35.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War II, Second World War, maritime 
patrol aircraft, maritime attack aircraft, carriers, nuclear weapons, 
jet aircraft, VSTOL, STOVL, helicopter carriers, Cold War

ISBN: 978-1-84832-171-7

IMAGE: B2507jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/mpwxpbc
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The author followed a career in the Fleet Air Arm with 
a stint as curator at the Fleet Air Arm Museum, before becoming a 
successful author of naval aviation histories. This is a 
comprehensive study of the bitter sweet post WWII history of 
British naval aviation and will become a standard reference for 
its subject.  -  Most Highly Recommended.

British naval aviation has been a bitter sweet experience since the 
end of WWII. It is sweet because the RN continues to innovate in 
naval aviation and most of its innovations are copied by the growing 
number of navies that take aircraft to sea. Mirror landing aids, 
angled flight decks, steam catapults, jet carrier aircraft, and much 
more, are all British inventions now taken for granted by all navies 
with carrier aviation capabilities. There have also been delicious 
moments when naval officers have fooled politicians to prevent them 
completely destroying British naval aviation through greed and 
ignorance. There have also been the bitter moments when politicians 
have sold off or scrapped vital naval aviation capabilities. The only 
brighter side of this neglect and venom has been that British light 
carriers have been operated long after their intended lives by other 
navies who bought them cheap in the politically directed fire sales. 
This has sometimes been excused as 'foreign aid' to poor friendly 
countries although that is hardly an excuse for the fire sale of Sea 
Harrier and Harrier jets to the US Government, robbing the FAA of 
fast jet capability for several years until the new Queen Elizabeth 
carriers enter service and eventually receive F-35 STOVL stealth 
fighters that may or may not deliver all that has been claimed for 
them. Had the Sea Harrier remained in British service the new 
carriers would have been able to put to sea for trials with a 
comprehensive air group until the F35 arrives. In the meantime the 
USMC is able to fill the hole in its first line inventory during the 
delivery delays of F-35 aircraft and able to do so at a bargain 
basement price, courtesy of the British taxpayer.

The author has blended his service experience with thorough research 
and produced a fine review of British naval aviation history since 
1945 that will become a standard reference work for other historians 
and writers and a valued new book for professionals and enthusiasts 
alike. There is a wealth of illustration throughout the book and it 
is difficult to praise the work too highly.

The only thing missing is a suggestion that the treatment of Admiral 
Byng could be profitably applied to politicians. Dragging a fair few 
out and shooting them could encourage the others to reverse the 
political neglect of British naval aviation by politicians.