The British Army in Italy 1917-1918

B1920

The authors have diligently researched the material released since 1967, producing an authoritative account of the British troops successes. This is a very readable account and supported by a photo plate section and maps.

This history is unlikely to be bettered and is destined to become a much sought after book.

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NAME: The British Army in Italy 1917-1918
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 170113
FILE: R1920
AUTHOR: John Wilks, Eileen Wilks
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 225
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Great War, WWI, World War One, 1914-1918, 1917, Italy, Austria, Germany, British Army
ISBN: 1-78346-171-3
IMAGE: B1920.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/p35skrw
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The disadvantage of the publishing habit of launching books to mark an anniversary is that major anniversaries generate a wealth of new books that have to compete with each other for the readers’ funds. As 1914 marks the hundredth anniversary of World War One, this terrible and great event is already generating a huge outpouring of new books. The publisher also has to consider that a book marking a late stage of the Great War risks being lost in reader fatigue if it is released close to its actual point in the conflict.

This new book covers an important but much under reported element of WWI. The enormous casualties and the great aerial battles fought on the Western Front from 1914 have dominated the efforts of historians and the interests of readers. The conflict in Italy from 1917 was a very important part of the conflict, offered some atrocious conditions in mountain trenches and occupied German and Austrian troops who would otherwise have been sent to the Western Front. Even at the time, the British troops in Italy were largely overlooked, as were their sons fighting up the Italian territory in WWII. Part of the lack of interest may well have been a general belief that life and war in Italy was a casual holiday as songs of WWII perpetuated with those British soldiers being written off as D-Day dodgers on holiday in sunny Italy, when the conditions were every bit as unpleasant as the worst in France and Germany, frequently worse, and where the enemy resisted with skill, courage and determination.

British and French troops were sent into Italy in October 1917 because the Italians were being driven back by a German-Austrian army that was advancing on Venice and threatened to roll up Italian forces and defeat them.

The under-reported British forces actions were decisive and arguably the most effective combat of any British force during WWI. The culmination of their campaigns resulted in the total defeat of the Austrian Army. In contrast, the Germans on the Western Front were allowed to withdraw to German territory, taking their arms with them and creating the conditions that could later be distorted by the Nazis in claiming that the Germans were never defeated, but betrayed by German politicians and Jews.

The authors have diligently researched the material released since 1967, producing an authoritative account of the British troops successes. This is a very readable account and supported by a photo plate section and maps.

This history is unlikely to be bettered and is destined to become a much sought after book.

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