The Bloody Road to Tunis, Destruction of the Axis Forces in North Africa, November 1942-May 1943

B2219

The author has painted a vivid picture and produced an authoritative account that may well prove the definitive history of the victory in North Africa.

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NAME: The Bloody Road to Tunis, Destruction of the Axis Forces in North Africa, November 1942-May 1943
DATE: 260815
FILE: R2219
AUTHOR: David Rolf
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 320
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, North Africa, Afrika Corps, Eisenhower, Montgomery, 8th Army, US forces, Rommel
ISBN: 978-1-84832-783-2
IMAGE: B2219.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/qxnqvq5
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Why should this book be read when there is so much available material on the subject? A question that is not asked often enough. Of course it is a difficult question to answer. All authors have carried out research and presented their view. In the case of this book the author has obviously diligently researched, using some valuable primary source material from both sides of the conflict. The result is a compelling account that follows the action blow-by-blow and delivers fresh insights in a very valuable addition to the available knowledge of the period of military history that determined who won WWII. Highly Commended.

When Churchill rejoiced in the victory at El Alamein by stating that the battle might have been the beginning of the beginning of the end, he was not being deprecating. The Eight Army achieved a stunning victory over the Africa Korps and began chasing them West along the North African coastal strip. It was certainly a good start, but a long way from the end. The North African campaign featured a series of almost cartoon chases. The Italians or the Germans advanced rapidly towards the great prize of the Suez Canal. The British fell back in reasonable order. As the Axis forces began to suffer from extended lines of supply, the British brought them to a standstill and then began to push them back towards Tunis with equal speed, only to suffer the same fate of groaning supply lines that slowed their advance until the enemy stopped them and began to push them back to Egypt. El Alamein was different only because the 8th Army caused serious structural damage to the German tanks, had Special Forces operating deep behind enemy lines, and had a much improved supply train established to follow the forward units with much needed ammunition, fuel and other vital supplies. There was also convincing air superiority that gave the Germans nowhere to hide. However. Something more was required.

The extra factor was the landing of a large Anglo-American force behind the Axis forces in Operation Torch. Initially the Torch forces made solid progress and were joined by French troops previously loyal to Vichy. Then Rommel struck at the largely untested US troops and drove them back. This encouraged Hitler to order reinforcements to be sent to North Africa, but the well-tested 8th Army surged forward and then linked up with the Torch troops, effectively cutting off the Afrika Korps and leaving it nowhere to go. The resulting victory was complete and North Africa was now Axis free.

The author has painted a vivid picture and produced an authoritative account that may well prove the definitive history of the victory in North Africa.

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