The Battleships of the Iowa Class, a Design and Operational History

This must be the definitive review of the Iowa Class battleships that were the last of their breed in active service, now preserved uniquely for visitors. A serious book at a serious price, beautifully produced and presented. It is a must for every military professional historian and military history enthusiast. – Most Highly Recommended.

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://bbn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

http://ftnews.firetrench.com

http://broadlyboatnews.com

NAME:   The Battleships of the Iowa Class, a Design and Operational History
FILE: R3174
AUTHOR: Philippe Caresse, translated by Bruce Taylor
PUBLISHER: US Naval Institute 
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £75.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Washington Naval Treaty, WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second 
World War, war at sea, naval architecture, naval big guns, 16 in guns, sea-keeping, 
Pacific, Japan, peacetime navy, Korean War, Cold War, Gulf War, preservation, anti-
aircraft guns, secondary armament, cruise missiles CIWS, Gatling guns

ISBN: 1-52677-318-X

PAGES: 522
IMAGE: B3174.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/ya47jrtx
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This must be the definitive review of the Iowa Class battleships that 
were the last of their breed in active service, now preserved uniquely for visitors. A 
serious book at a serious price, beautifully produced and presented. It is a must 
for every military professional, historian and military history enthusiast. – Most 
Highly Recommended.


When a book like this comes across the desk for review, it raises the sadness at the contraction and closure of lending libraries because this is a book that is beyond the pockets of many readers who were once so ably served by lending libraries. For the serious student of military, and specifically naval, history it represents great value for money. The author has a passion for his subject and an attention to detail that a book like this deserves. The text is served very well by a wealth of photographs, many of them rare, some outstanding sketches and detailed drawings. The quality of production and presentation is outstanding.

The Iowa Class were the pinnacle of US battleship design and construction. The economy wartime construction HMS Vanguard, armed with her great aunts teeth, was to prove a much better sea-keeper than the Iowa Class in post-WWII exercises. The Japanese had deployed battleships with greater guns during WWII, and the German Tirpitz and Bismark were arguably the best armoured battleships, not that that saved them from being sunk by the British. However, the Iowa Class outlived them all and are now preserved for visitors.

Built for the post-Pearl Harbour revenge, the Iowas took advantage of all of the skill and history of US Battleship design. They were well-built and employed the best materials and components available. They enjoyed a long history, coming back into service for the Vietnam War and the 1990/91 Gulf War. They carried a formidable anti-aircraft armament, correcting the deficiencies so often seen in other battleships. They were equipped with spotter planes but from the beginning used the most capable radar available that made spotter seaplanes largely unnecessary. They hosted helicopters and the secondary armament was cut back to make way for cruise missiles and radar controlled Close In Weapons Systems. When finally retired they were the end of an era not just for the US Navy but for the World.