The Allied War Against France

The euphoria generated by the successful landings in Normandy, and the subsequent breakout from the beachheads, has largely glossed over the consequences and collateral damage in France. The author has provided a worthy evaluation of the costs, with the short term and long term effects – Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: The Allied War Against France
FILE: R2681
AUTHOR: Stephen Alan Bourque
PUBLISHER: Naval Institute Press
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  352
PRICE: $34.95
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, World War 2, D-Day, 
Op Overlord, Normandy, beach landings, breakout, 1944 Battle of 
France, Free French, British, Canadians, US forces, Wehrmacht, 
bombing, shelling.

ISBN: 978-1-61251-873-2

IMAGE: B2681.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yb729hub
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The euphoria generated by the successful landings in 
Normandy, and the subsequent breakout from the beachheads, has 
largely glossed over the consequences and collateral damage in 
France. The author has provided a worthy evaluation of the costs, 
with the short term and long term effects – Most Highly Recommended.

Understandably, historians have concentrated on the Normandy Landings 
and the break-out from the beaches. These two stages were each 
critical to the success of the liberation of Europe by Britain, US, 
and Canada. The Landings were unique. Never before had anything on 
this scale been attempted in history and in military theory it 
should have failed, given the defences put in place by Hitler. Only 
careful reconnaissance and planning, training and ingenuity made 
this stunning victory a fact of history. However, the next stage 
was to break out from the beaches. The longer this was delayed, the 
more likely that German forces could be rushed in to throw the 
Allies back into the sea from narrow beachheads. Again, the critical 
element was the use of airborne forces and resistance fighters to 
delay the arrival of German reinforcements. This had never been 
attempted before. Large scale landings inland by paratroops and 
glider troops had seized bridges and other key communication points 
to deny them to the enemy and make them available to Allied troops 
fighting out from the beaches. The part played by the French 
resistance added to the obstructions placed before the enemy. This 
was stirring stuff for the news reels at the time and to historians 
subsequently. It made great entertainment in fictional books and 
films. Unfortunately it blanked out the carnage in France.

Normally, war reporters would have made more comment as they passed 
through the devastated French towns and countryside with the wrecked 
roads and rail networks. However, the next big attention grabbers 
were Market Garden which was a huge gamble to try to cut the war 
short and the epic struggle as the British Forces clung on to the 
last bridge in the rapid advance, way beyond any reasonable 
expectations, was such a courageous stand that it occupied much 
news space and much attention since then. It rivalled the other 
two attention grabbers, the Nazi last throw in the Ardennes, with 
the Battle of the Bulge, and the crossing of the Rhine by the Allies, 
including the last mass assault by airborne troops.

The author has addressed this information deficit with this new book.

The French were torn at the time. They wanted to be free of German 
oppression so badly that they were prepared to endure great hardship 
and cost. They almost welcomed being bombed heavily by Allied 
aircraft wanting the Germans but back in their box. On the other 
hand, they were human. The lost of friends and family, the 
devastation of their towns and the destruction of roads and railways 
was a terrible price. It inevitably caused some animosity, mainly 
after the soldiers had moved away towards Germany.

Some French politicians tried to exploit the pain in their hatred of 
Britain and the US. That exploitation continues more than 70 years 
later as the EU tries to find new ways to punish the US and the UK. 
The core EU project is still to create a United States of Europe 
that can humble the US and move to world domination under the Master 
Race, remarkably close to the Nazi objectives, but then it is easy 
to forget that a large number of French politicians welcomed the 
Nazis in 1940 and enthusiastically collaborated with them, even 
down to sending French Jews to the German extermination camps.

The author looks at the situation in 1944 and its implications then 
and into the future for European relations.