Tank Craft, Churchill Tanks, British Army, North-West Europe 1944-1945

The Tank Craft series has become very popular with modellers and enthusiasts. This new addition to the range meets the criteria of excellent photographs and drawings with descriptive text and full captions – Very Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Tank Craft, Churchill Tanks, British Army, North-West 
Europe 1944-1945
FILE: R2615
AUTHOR: Dennis Oliver
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  65
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, 
British Army, armour, infantry tank, specialist variants, D-Day

ISBN: 1-52671-088-9

IMAGE: B2615.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ybb2pczx
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The Tank Craft series has become very popular with 
modellers and enthusiasts. This new addition to the range meets 
the criteria of excellent photographs and drawings with descriptive 
text and full captions – Very Highly Recommended.

The British continued to design, develop and produce new tank 
types even though there was a reliable flow of American tanks. 
One type that was virtually unique to the British Army was the 
infantry tank. The Matilda and Valentine tanks were followed by 
the Churchill. This type was basically a self-propelled pillbox. 
It featured very heavy armour, an adequate gun that was behind the 
type usually fitted to gun tanks that were expected to fight other 
tanks, and it was relatively slow. The design was in many respects 
an updated version of the original 'male' tanks used during WWI to 
break through trench lines.

The Churchill followed this pattern and mounted a QF 6 pounder 
main gun, adequate to take on opposing infantry dug in ahead and 
move steadily forward with infantry following on, on foot. The 
MkIII through Mk VIII were produced in relatively small numbers 
and the turret was up-gunned to 75mm and 95mm. The most numerous 
model was the Mk IV of which almost 200 were produced. Perhaps the 
most important models were the 'specials' or 'funnies' produced 
for D-Day. These models included an Armoured Recovery Vehicle, the 
Crocodile flame thrower, Bridge-layer, and the AVRE armed with a 
290 mm Petard mortar. Churchill tanks were modified to lay 'carpet' 
roadways, drop fascines into trenches to bridge them and to wade 
ashore at Normandy.

This book contains a great deal of information in text and images, 
including some nicely executed full colour drawings. Having provided 
a good history and a multitude of drawings of Churchills in action, 
the book provides a very comprehensive list of model kits and 
accessories. There is everything to satisfy both the modeller 
and the enthusiast.