Sydney Camm, Hurricane and Harrier Designer, Saviour of Britain

Sydney Camm has never received the attention he richly deserved. This new book goes a very long way to rectifying the omissions of historians – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Sydney Camm, Hurricane and Harrier Designer, Saviour of Britain
FILE: R2992
AUTHOR: John Sweetman
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Air World
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War 2, WW2, World War II, World War 2, WWII, Cold War, 
Korean War, Falklands War, Hurricane, Fury, Tempest, Typhoon, Sea Fury, Hunter, 
Harrier, Sea Harrier

ISBN: 1-52675-622-6

IMAGE: B2992.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y4mzhkpr
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: Sydney Camm has never received the attention he richly deserved. 
This new book goes a very long way to rectifying the omissions of historians –    
Most Highly Recommended.

Sydney Camm did not come from a privileged background as did many of his 
contemporaries. Raised in a terraced house with eleven siblings, he lacked a 
financially secure background, but he was to become an outstanding aviation 
engineer and designer. He was part of the team at Hawker Aircraft Company that 
was responsible for many of the wood and steel tube framed biplanes used by the 
RAF and the Fleet Air Arm. They were built to Air Ministry specifications that were 
conservative and uninspiring, resulting in aircraft that were little advance on the 
aircraft of WWI. That was not the fault of the aircraft companies and their designers, 
but the bureaucrats and politicians.

In the early thirties, Britain slowly started to wake up to the threats posed by 
Germany to European and World peace.  British aviation was also pushing the 
design boundaries in private venture work and Supermarine was to produce the float 
planes that secured for all time the Schneider Trophy for racing float planes. The Air 
Ministry woke from its slumbers and started issuing more ambitious specifications 
for military aircraft. One of these new specifications was to lead to the Hurricane and 
Spitfire that complemented each other and prevented the Germans for gaining air 
superiority over the Channel and Southern Britain, as a vital consideration to enable 
an invasion of Britain.

Mitchell took his Trophy winning float planes as the starting point for the Spitfire. 
This was to introduce many production and maintenance challenges and take much 
longer to result in a fighter with frontline squadrons. Camm took the Hawker Hart 
and Fury as a starting point which was to produce a much faster development period 
without the production difficulties of the more advanced Spitfire structure. Without 
one of these two aircraft the Battle of Britain might not have been a British victory. 
In 1940, the two designs very nicely complimented each other, with the Hurricane 
proving a solid reliable gun platform that shot down many more aircraft than the 
Spitfire, while the sparkling performance of the Spitfire kept the German fighters 
away from the Hurricanes as they carved their way through massive German bomber 
formations. Mitchell is remembered for his superlative leading edge design and 
untimely death. Camm escaped the applause and attention he deserved but put in a 
long and fruitful career that continued to deliver battle winning aircraft through to the 
outstanding Harrier VSTOL jet.

The author has traced this illustrious career and there is a useful monochrome photo-
plate section in support.