Stauffenberg Symbol of Resistance, The Man Who Almost Killed Hitler

The story of Stauffenberg and the attempt to kill Hitler is full of inconsistencies and misunderstandings which this book serves to correct out. The German Officer Corps had very mixed feelings towards Hitler and the Nazis. This comes out clearly from the Operation Valkyrie. – Highly Recommended

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NAME: Stauffenberg Symbol of Resistance, The Man Who Almost Killed Hitler
FILE: R2885
AUTHOR: Wolfgang Venohr
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword, frontline Books
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 222
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: German officer corps, WWII, World War II, World War Two, World 
War 2, Second World War, Afrika Korps, Wolf's Lair, Adolf Hitler, SS, High
 Command, Eastern Front, assassination attempts, Nazis, German Resistance

ISBN: 1-47385-683-7

IMAGE: B2885.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y5fhjsnu
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The story of Stauffenberg and the attempt to kill Hitler is full of 
inconsistencies and misunderstandings which this book serves to correct out. The 
German Officer Corps had very mixed feelings towards Hitler and the Nazis. 
This comes out clearly from the Operation Valkyrie. –   Highly Recommended

Adolf Hitler was widely regarded as a joke within the Wehrmacht's Officer Corps 
as he struggled to power. Hindenburg regarded him as a nobody corporal and that 
was typical of the perception of German officers. However, they seriously 
underestimated him at their cost and walked into the trap he set them in requiring 
their oath to him as their Leader. Even the most sceptical officers were very reluctant 
to take any action that broke that oath.

Stauffenberg had served in the Africa Korps before receiving serious wounds that 
forced him to accept duties away from direct fighting. By then only the most 
committed Nazis believed Hitler could win the war he had caused. Most officers 
expected eventual defeat, unless they could find some way of placating the Allies 
sufficiently to allow a negotiated armistice. This became a most difficult situation 
for them. They felt honour would not allow them to break their oath to Hitler and 
they held surprisingly naive views about the Allies and their reaction to post-Hitler 
conditions. Many felt that the British were a Germanic people who must have a 
similar hatred of the Bolsheviks and would be prepared to forgive much to end the 
war and join with Germany against the Soviets. It was an extremely confused 
situation that does much to explain why Operation Valkyrie was started and why 
it so quickly ended in terrible disaster.

Stauffenberg has been seen variously as an incompetent, a traitor, a patriot, a 
decorated officer, a brave man, a coward. In reality he may have been none of these 
things and still a composite of them. A fair assessment of him is very difficult 
because he was subject to pressures and constraints that are difficult to understand 
outside the German officer corps.

In planting a bomb at Hitler's Eastern Headquarters, the coup conspirators faced 
formidable risks and variables that were very difficult to plan for adequately. By 
planting the bomb and then leaving, Stauffenberg had to assume the obvious 
explosion had worked and that he had to reach Berlin quickly to activate Valkyrie. 
We know now that Hitler was very lucky to survive but his survival meant that the 
conspirators had to move very quickly and seize all the levers of power. In the event, 
many of them dithered, momentum was lost and Hitler had the time to mobilize his 
supporters.

This book paints a graphic picture of the assassination attempt and its aftermath. 
What might have unfolded, had it succeeded, is unlikely to have shared the 
aspirations and assumptions of the conspirators because what they did not 
understand was the agreement between Britain, America, and the Soviets to 
accept only unconditional surrender.