Spying for the Fuhrer, Hitler’s Espionage Machine

Syping4Fuhrer

The author has provided a rounded review of German intelligence under the Nazis. There has 
been a lack of books reviewing the German intelligence operations in a comprehensive study 
and this book is all the more welcome for that.
This larger format book contains many very good photographs through 
the body of the book. It is a fascinating read and covers the German intelligence agencies, 
their relationships and their performance.
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NAME: Spying for the Fuhrer, Hitler's Espionage Machine
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 290414
FILE: R1968
AUTHOR: Christer Jorgensen
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  224
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Espionage, Counter Espionage, SIS, SOE, SD, Abwehr, Second World War, 
WWII, World War Two, 1939-1945, 1933-1939
ISBN: 978-1-4738-2306-8
IMAGE: B1968.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/payoehn
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: This larger format book contains many very good photographs through 
the body of the book. It is a fascinating read and covers the German intelligence agencies, 
their relationships and their performance.

Germany did not have more intelligence services than many other countries and although 
Hitler was very happy to pit his subordinates against each other, the general relationship 
was not any more acrimonious than in other countries. Britain primarily employed an internal 
counter-intelligence service and an external intelligence service, but also had a variety of 
other agencies that held some intelligence responsibilities. These agencies were known to be 
in conflict from time to time and WWII was to see something of an explosion of intelligence 
services, private armies, covert operations and specialist units. These frequently came into 
conflict with each other and there was a general lack of communication between many of 
them, resulting in much overlap. The German services should therefore be seen in that light.

One surprising aspect of German intelligence and special forces was their relative lack of success. 
The British managed to fool them on several occasions by misdirection and the planting of 
information where the Germans accepted bodies with secret documents that conveniently turned 
up on shores friendly to the Germans. This may have been partly a result of the effectiveness of 
British counter-intelligence it detecting, blocking and turning German agents inside the British Isles. 
Denied a source of reliable information from Britain, the Germans did not have very much to 
compare other intelligence against when it was acquired elsewhere.

The Abwehr under Admiral Canaris led a very independent line of activity, refusing to undertake 
some activities that were demanded by Hitler. The SS set up its own intelligence service, the SD, 
which took on activities such as the attempts to support the German fiction that the invasion of 
Poland being self-defence. Within the SS covert activities there were successes, such as the 
rescue of Mussolini from prison.

The full story of the Abwehr may never be told. Canaris was implicated in attempted assassinations 
of Hitler and was eventually executed in the closing days of the war. Some have suggested that 
Canaris had been an active agent of British intelligence and there were many events that could 
support the theory. Certainly, Canaris was not a supporter of the Nazis and, like other German 
military figures, often gave the coolest support for many of Hitler's actions. The mystery is how 
he got away with his general performance when Himmler strongly disliked him and resented the 
competition between the Abwehr and the SD. There is also suspicion that the Abwehr gave away 
some of its agents to the British.

The author has provided a rounded review of German intelligence under the Nazis. There has 
been a lack of books reviewing the German intelligence operations in a comprehensive study 
and this book is all the more welcome for that.